When a 16-Year-Old Is Locked Up in a Supermax Prison | Stickup Kid | FRONTLINE


Here’s a glimpse into my past To help you better understand It was mistakes that brought me
to this place Where they degrade men, And hands I would trade Because it made me a slave, Bondage and a cage, Frustration, I’m enraged, This was my last resort, I ain’t no stickup kid, On my last Newport,
no place to live, Here’s a glimpse into my past
to help you better understand, Everything that I am not
makes me who I am. I was 16. I had just turned 16. They had cages like they would
have at the zoo, but they were sectioned off,
right. And there were guys filled
with them at capacity. I just was like, you know,
I am not one of them. I do not belong here. I do not want to be here. I want to go home. (faint voices in background) I have 13 years. I don’t know if I could do it. I don’t know if I could wake up
every day, look at the same wall every day. Like, about six months in,
I gave up. I’m not scared to admit. I can’t handle prison. I’m not that strong. I wasn’t like a hellion
or nothing like that, or like just the worst kid. But I got in trouble
a little bit. My mom was mad at me. So I run away. I met somebody
and I went to his apartment. He talked to me,
asked me questions, like did I want to stay there
for a little while. I could stay there
for a couple of days. They cooked me food,
they fed me. I thought, “You know what? I’m just gonna try to go home.” And he said,
“You’re going home?” So he left and went in the room. When he came back out,
he came back out with a gun. And he said, “You think you’re
gonna eat my food for free? “You think you’re gonna live in
my house and just walk out? “And things come free like that? No, nothing’s free.” And he said, “No, you’re gonna
have to rob this store.” The way he made it sound was
like this: “If you do it for me, and if you
do it successfully, “I’ll probably even give you
some of the money. But you’re gonna do this
for me.” It was in a Fastrip gas station. I remember seeing gangster
movies, “Menace II Society,” “Boyz n the Hood,”
where they had guns. And in all those movies,
when they pulled their gun out, they held it like this. So that’s what I did. I put the gun to the guy’s
chest, and I said “Empty up.” – I hit my hand down like that. The gun went off–
smoke, commotion. No customers in the store. – When the gun went off,
it snapped me to attention. I was, like,
“Vacate the premises.” So I tried to run. Store clerks hopped on top of me
and started beating me. I said, “God, if you get me out
of this, I swear I’ll be good. “I swear. “You have my word. “Get me out of this
and I’ll be a good boy. “I promise. Amen.” – And then we held him at
gunpoint until the cops came. You have a lot of adrenaline
running through your head at the time, so you’re not
really thinking till after, and then it all started
sinking in that this is really, um, a kid. – Alarming news reports describing teens as time bombs
and superpredators. – Youth is no excuse for
committing murder, robbery, rape, home invasions or for terrorizing
entire neighborhoods. – Proponents argue stern
measures are necessary to combat rising youth crimes. – Many of the worst
superpredators were juveniles and they were being referred
to a system that was created to handle bad boys. We were walking around
basically unarmed in terms of our penal statutes
when it came to juveniles. And that is why Proposition 21
came about. – In California, a zero
tolerance youth crime initiative is on the March 7 ballot. – Opponents say the measure
would sweep more youth into the criminal justice system
in a state that already locks up more kids per capita
than any other. – These crimes are dangerous. What people have to remember is
that a lot of people out there who are trying to make a living have a right not to be terrified and their right, frankly, trumps
an ex post facto sob story. – Alonza Thomas was the first
minor tried as an adult under Prop. 21 in Kern County. – Was Alonza a juvenile
superpredator? – Absolutely not. Absolutely not. It surprised me why
the prosecutor would file in adult court because
the robbery was botched and it was botched because
he was a 15-year-old youngster. Many minors are impacted
by adults. They’re impacted and influenced
to do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do, and that needs to be taken
into consideration. When you’re 14, 15 years old, even if you commit a serious
or violent felony, the potential is great
for rehabilitation. I don’t think that in most cases
it’s appropriate to process a 14-year-old or 15-year-old
through the adult system unless it’s merited. Sometimes it is,
most of the time it’s not. – He did the crime, and he had
to be held accountable. But to be tried as an adult? You have this young man
that you… that didn’t have one blemish
on his record sent away as an adult,
tried as an adult. Why? – If I would have been
more brave or a little bit more determined
to not go into that store, maybe I could have did something
different, you know? But I was just so scared, I
thought I had no other choice. – It would be
inconceivable for us and for most prosecutors
in California not to direct file
in superior court robbery with the use
of a firearm. That particular crime is
the most dangerous crime that there is,
absent a homicide itself. We either treat people
who commit that kind of crime very seriously in order to
protect people like his victims or we don’t. There’s no middle ground. – They dropped two counts
of armed robbery and they charged me with
one count of armed robbery, second degree robbery. So altogether,
they gave me 13 years. – I remember looking at him,
and he looked so innocent. And I hugged him and I kissed
him, and I said, “I love you.” And they walked him out. – Every time you go somewhere
out of your cell, you go to a cage. Sometimes the cages are half
the size of a phone booth. So, you can’t move
your elbows even up. And then when you leave
that cage, they cuff you up and lead you back
to another cage. You’re just always
from cage to cage. There’s a big wall on 4b. When I got there and I saw that
wall, it was like, just me against this wall,
you know? I don’t know if I could do it. The whole building was yelling,
kicking on the door. “Man down, he’s hanging! He’s hanging, man down,
he’s hanging, we have a hanger!” So some time went by. They brought him out. Everyone already knows
he’s dead. And he never came back. That’s the last time I saw him. I thought, “That’s gonna be me
in a couple of years. “I’m gonna lose my mind. “I’m not gonna be able
to take it. “I’m not gonna
be able to take it and I’m gonna have
to check out.” – “I am writing concerned
about my future here in CDCR “and my life in general. “I’m not trying to be funny,
but I feel I’m Humpty Dumpty. “I guess you could say I had
a big fall. “I committed a robbery that got
me locked up, “and I honestly feel all the
psychologists, psychiatrists, “counselors, officers
can’t help me. “They can’t put me
back together again. I need you, badly.” And it’s signed, “Sincerely,
a young man crying out for help. Alonza Thomas.” The idea of a 16-year-old going
to a California men’s prison is beyond my comprehension. It is an extremely dangerous,
complicated place. It is a place where you have
very few systems of support, very few systems of protection. So here’s a young man
who was put into this terrible environment with a long sentence
in front of him and very little ability to cope. One way that the system
encourages people like Alonza who are vulnerable,
who are young, to cope, is to go into segregation. They literally encourage you
to go into solitary confinement for protection. And once you’re in segregation, things just spiral
out of control. – I overdosed. Swallowed, like, 300 pills,
250 pills. I would cut myself. Sometimes I would be curled up
in the corner for weeks not eating,
just crying, shaking and stuff. I would just lose it, you know. I would just lose it. I would just sit down
and talk to people like they were sitting
right there with me. I would have full conversations. I would answer their questions
and I’d answer my questions. But I would have full
conversations, you know. It might sound crazy,
but whatever works. Being in a room for 23 hours
a day is crazy. – How was it seeing him? It was awful. Shackles on his hands and feet. He was in isolation for so long,
he didn’t have a color. He was gray. What did I do? I smiled. “I’m glad I was able to make it
this weekend. How are you doing?” He smiled as well. And we talked. And we ignored the obvious. – What happens is when you send
them to state prison at that young age, they come out of prison an
entirely different person. – 33, close your door. 44, close your door. – We should think about what we
are doing to our young people, even if they have committed
a violent or serious felony at the age of 14, 15, what we’re doing to them by
sending them to an adult prison like this county did
to Alonza Thomas. – He was punished, he was taken
off the streets at… during the time period when he was most likely
to commit another crime. You can’t afford to spend
an inordinate amount of time feeling sorry for people, no matter how young, who are
willing to commit crimes. – Before I got out,
I was in a cage and I was talking to a doctor
and I was in a little cage, probably about the size of this
chair, and the doctor said, “Well, what are you worried
about? You should be happy,
you’re going home.” And I said, “This right here,
this cage, “me sitting in this cage,
it feels safe to me. “This feels safe, this feels
comfortable, this feels normal. “But when I’m out there and I
can’t touch these walls, “I can’t pace back and forth and
be in my own little world… Really what it means to me is,
I’m institutionalized.” (quiet conversation
in background) What house is it? – This is not our house. – It’s that one, over there. – After 13 years, it was over,
you know? – Everybody’s there. – After 13 years, it was over. – Good to see you, man. – I missed you. – Yeah, man. – I missed you. I hated when
they separated us, man. – Yeah. – You all right? – Yeah, I’m all right. – We just crossed over it. Like our old house, 316, is just
right down, right… – Just right down the street. – What y’all got to eat
over here, man? (everyone talking, laughing) – Okay, this is one of
the things Alonza asked for when he come home. – For 13 years, they waited. – He wanted some shrimp, so I’m
gonna cook him some shrimp. If it doesn’t sizzle when you
drop it in, you’re doing it wrong. – Inside, I’m still that same
15-year-old. Blow it. Please. They didn’t care what prison
did to me. I’m still the same person. – Come on, we’ll eat this meal
together. This is Jubee’s first…
come on, get one, Phillip. – It was the greatest moment, the greatest feeling of my life
to see him again. You’ve been really waiting
for this moment, like, forever. I honestly don’t remember
the first time I heard that he was going to be gone
for that long. I was really young. I was probably, like, ten,
11 years old. It was just different
not having him around, not being able to talk
about football and just do that type of stuff. (cheering) I ended up playing football
at Bakersfield High and, you know, it would have been cool for him
to see me play there or play in college. – And it’s in and out of the
hands of the intended receiver! – Phillip was very successful. He broke records. Unanimous All-American. First one in the history
of Fresno State to receive that award. Can you imagine the joy
Alonza must have felt, saying, “That’s my brother.” – I had stacks. Stacks of articles,
of highlights, of interviews. Pictures, everything. If I would have stacked it up
page by page, it probably would have went up
in the air about five or six feet. I knew he would make it
to the NFL, and there was no doubt
in my mind. There was none. – My name is Rich Eisen. Pleased that you are with us
for rounds four through seven for a draft that may have
its best value go today. – I was projected to go
at a certain spot. I was projected to be, like,
a second round pick or whatever. – By the third round, you know,
we were all feeling like, uh, I don’t know. And we didn’t know, you know,
how to really feel. And my stepdad Dimos, he was like, you know,
“Let me watch a little more. You know, get it out
of my system.” “Okay.” Like, not even ten seconds
after he said that, he starts screaming. “Whoo, whoo!” – Phillip Thomas, a safety
out of Fresno State gets the latest Redskins… I started screaming, I said,
“Whoo!” and I took off running. – And that is a great pick,
I believe, for the Redskins. – That was a great day. – The nurse came by
and I’m, like, um, “Nurse, can you do me a favor? “I have a little brother, he
entered the draft this year, “and I want to know where he
went in the draft or did he get drafted?” She goes, “What’s his name?” So I told her his name and she
left and about 20 minutes later she came back and she goes,
“Washington Redskins.” And I said, “Washington
Redskins,” all right. I could dig it. That could be my team now,
you know. – He hasn’t seen me play
a game ever, you know? And I think he said he looked up
my highlights before, but it’s not the same. I just really can’t wait for him
to be able to come and finally see
what his little bro can do. – Your number should be
at the top. – Yeah, it’s right there. – See, your number’s at the top. That’s where mine is. You calling yourself? – I’m calling her. It’s an adjustment. It’s a learning experience,
you know? I have to deprogram myself. Hello. – Hi, I’m Valerie Rangel. – I’m Alonza Thomas, Jr. – Alonzo? – Alonza.
– Alonza Thomas Jr. And do you have your application
with you? – I have to adjust to being
free, you know. – So are you working at all? – No, I’m not working. – You were just recently
released, is that correct? – Yes, I did 13 years. I got released
two-and-a-half weeks ago. I don’t know what it feels like
to have a job. Never had a job before. I never been to the prom,
or on a date. Never been on a date,
never driven a car. I’m learning things at 28 I
should have learned at 15. So what do I do? – Put your foot on the brake.
– Foot’s on the brake. – Start the car. Keep your foot on the brake.
– Foot’s on the brake. – Put it in reverse. Do not take your foot…
now, you ease your foot off. Make sure no cars
are around you. – Where’s, uh,
where’s it say it at? – Right here.
– Okay, I see. Every little accomplishment that
I make, I’m one step closer to getting my life back,
you know. Learning how to drive
is one step closer to regaining my childhood
that I lost or regaining my manhood
that I never had. – Does he deserve
a second chance now? – He did his time. He deserves to be treated
like any other citizen. He deserves to be treated fairly
and be given a fair chance. – When you first decided
to create your own histogram, what did you all have in common? – Years of prison. – Years in prison. Something we all have in common. Show the histogram? – He doesn’t deserve any breaks that a similarly situated
citizen who hadn’t committed an armed
robbery wouldn’t get. – That’s very good, very good. Good comparison. – I think he was harmed. I think he suffered
permanent harm as a result of his experience in the California Department
of Corrections. In other words,
he is worse off now than he would have been
if he hadn’t gone to prison. – What medications do you have
now that you’re out? – Well, they just changed them
today. I’m on Remeron, 15 milligrams,
once a day at nighttime. I’m on BuSpars, twice a day, once in the morning,
once at night. And I’m on Risperidone. I’m on four milligrams
every night. – What are those drugs for? – Some are anti-psychotic,
some are anti-depressant, and one’s for anxiety. – Are you taking them? – Sure. (clicking) Then I said,
“Good evening, baby bro. I love you more than
anything in the world.” Then he said, “I love you too.” – He seems a little different. He’s different,
he’s definitely different. It’s definitely noticeable. He’s been incarcerated for just as long as he’s been
out of prison. – Two days later I said, “Good
morning, baby bro, I love you.” My biggest fear is becoming
a burden to somebody, and, um, I don’t want to be
a burden to anybody due to my crime, due to
something that I did, you know? – He’s made it over
one of the scary periods. He didn’t commit any crimes,
he was not sent back to jail, he wasn’t sent back to prison. We all need some kind of
structures to help us through and he has a family that’s
still standing behind him. – You like it, Lilla? – Mm-hmm. – I see my brother or my niece
and, you know, I just stare at her,
I just stare at her, you know. I’m learning these things
over again. I’m barely meeting these people
for the first time. Just getting to know them is
a blessing, you know? – Delicious. – Here you go. – But it’s like everything I do, it automatically takes me
back to prison. I sit there and I see Mom
cutting the meatloaf with a knife and I’m thinking, “She’s going
to get a write-up. She’s not supposed
to have that knife.” And it’s like, “Okay, I’m free
again,” you know. “I’m free, she’s just cutting
the meatloaf with a knife and it’s okay.” I talked to my doctor today. She said, “Oh, you’re still
in the honeymoon stage.” I said, “The honeymoon stage?” I thought about it. I thought that that sounds about
right, the honeymoon stage. It’s gonna be honeymoon stage
for a long time, you know. – What’s after
the honeymoon stage? – The rest of my life. I don’t sleep often, but
sometimes when I sleep I just, I don’t know, I wake up
and I get up and I don’t realize
where I’m at. – Does it feel good? – Does it feel good? – To realize you’re not
in prison anymore? – No. – I would think that
would feel good. – Yeah. – To remember that you’re free. – Yeah, it doesn’t feel good. “I’ve made a lot of decisions “that has shaped the man
I am today. “Some I’m not proud of, “but through all the bullshit,
I am proud of me. “I’ve learned and shown growth
after every fall. “And I’ll continue
to keep rising. “It all gets better in time. “Every time you think you can’t
make it another day, something or someone
picks you up.” I don’t know if anyone will ever
read this stuff and really, actually, genuinely
feel hope. I’m just trying while I’m here. – Why is it important to give
other people hope? – I told you,
because I don’t have any. Teardrops cease,
I’m all cried out, I’ve been through so much,
at times I wanna shout, I can’t let ’em win,
Alonza keep faith, Hop in, sink or swim,
but the sharks give chase, I’ve been to this point
so many times, When I get past it just rewinds, I walked in that court
prepared to die, So when he said 13,
I didn’t cry, I didn’t die or bat my eyes, I raised my cuffs
and I waved goodbye, Goodbye to that young man
who never got to live, Goodbye to that old soul
who never was a kid, I’m trapped in a cage,
all my rage has been bottled, All my winters come in May
and brighter days never follow, I overstand injustice
so there’ll never be peace, It pains me to witness,
that’s why my eyes weep, But if any man or God could see
the misery within, Then maybe that pain’ll
blow away with the wind.

100 thoughts on “When a 16-Year-Old Is Locked Up in a Supermax Prison | Stickup Kid | FRONTLINE

  1. Im all for punishing kids that are commiting crimes but unless its murder they should focus on the rehabilitation.
    This way they punish kids double as hard by putting them in an adult jail and not helping them rehabilitate at all.
    When these kids come out they missed years of developing and so you cant count the years double in my opinion.
    Kids CAN change unless they are psychopates but now they change the kids for the worse and act like its their fault when they come back.
    USA is such a retarded countrie in many many many ways.

  2. You have a gun, how that man get the drop on you. Stupid!
    Super Preditor huh! sounds familiar . This wasn’t during the Clinton administration by any chance was it. Prison for profit, who’s the real predator.

  3. I'M WATCHING THIS STORY AND IT IS SAD BUT WE ALL HAVE TO THINK OF THE VICTIM(S). WHAT IS HE OR SHE GOING THROUGH? DO THEY HAVE PTSD, AFRAID TO GO OUTSIDE OR BE ALONE? ALTHOUGH HE HAD NO PRIORS, I AM CURIOUS TO WHY HE ONE DAY COMMITTED AN ARMED ROBBERY? HOW IS IT THAT ONE BROTHER WENT TO COLLEGE BUT HE CHOSE CRIME? IT IS ALSO KNOWN THAT SEVERAL SMALL CRIMES LEAD TO BIG ONES. THE SYSTEM CAN'T KEEP AN ADULT WHO WAS CHARGED WITH A SEVERE CRIME WITH MINORS ONCE OF LEGAL AGE, SO HE/SHE HAS TO GO SOMEWHERE. YES, WE ALL MAKE MISTAKES, BUT WE MUST STAND ACCOUNT FOR THEM.

  4. As soon as I seen this I knew something was wrong with him. He needed help other than prison. Hate them mf devils.

  5. That's bull shit wht boy rapes girl 2017 and gets 3 months this system sucks it works when u got money and if you don't you done

  6. Attention Parents teach your kids to be responsible for their actions at a young age and this tends not to happen

  7. This Brother is intelligent. The drugs will make him crazy. I hope he get off of them. I am glad he is out. Young people, please stay out of trouble.

  8. i feel if u do the crime you should do the time. he could have killed someone!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! He could have gone to the police for help. What did he think was gonna happen…i feel bad for the person in the store…he could have lost his life. That is the whole part of this that pisses me off…he HAD other choices.

  9. Punishment should be like tasers , these guys issuing it or passing laws should have to try it first. That douche bag saying lock everything up is an idiot. I was a juvenile tried as adult in California who made a mistake and they sent me to prison as well. I came home violent as hell . It took me many years of therapy etc. to finally get it together.

  10. They always to give the black man the worst punishment but say the white man are just mental ill this system wasn’t made for us black man please do what you have to do and more white people will get what they deserve because slavery was the most hideous crime ever and still the government hasn’t payed the price and not talking about money im saying revenge a eye for an eye 👌🏾

  11. …WHAT'S THE ANSWER – WHEN COMMERCIALISM/CAPITALISM IS THE MAIN PROPAGANDA… – ? – WHEN KIDS DON'T HAVE WHAT THE OTHERS DO – ? – WHEN THEY WANT THE LASTEST GEAR – BUT YOU DON'T BUY IT – BC – YOU'RE AFRAID OF FOR THEIR SAFETY… – SO THEY GET IT THEMSELVES – AND – THE PARENTS TURN A BLIND EYE… – WHEN I WAS COMING UP – WE COULDN'T BRING ANYTHING INTO THE HOUSE – OUR PARENTS DIDN'T BUY… – NOT ONLY DID WE GET A BEATING WITH A BELT – WE HAS TO TAKE IT BACK… – THESE KIDS NEED MORE OF THAT… – AND – ALL OF THE DIRTY MONEY SEIZED… – SHOULD BE PUT INTO EDUCATION… – AND – BIGGER SCHOOLS NEED TO BE BUILT… – THE SALARIES OF TEACHERS NEED TO BE DOUBLED… – THE CHILDREN SHOULDN'T BE ALLOWED TO BE ABSENT FROM SCHOOL – OR – HERASSE/TALKBACK/TOUCH THE TEACHERS… – IT'S SAD WHEN THE TEACHER CAN'T TEACH BC THE CHILD IS ACTING OUT – AND – THE PARENT COMES UP AND BEATS THE EDUCATORS… – STOP TALKING – AND – DOING THINGS (YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN…) IN FRONT OF THE CHILDREN… – IT DOES START AT HOME… – GO TO THE PTA MEETINGS… – COUNCIL MEETINGS ETC. MAKE A DIFFERENCE – WE MUST CHANGE – WITHOUT CHANGE WE CANNOT AND WILL NOT PROGRESS… – ALLEGEDLY

  12. The reason why they're doing it is cause it bring the workers of the prison a job cause at the end of the day prison is a job. If their no prisoner then their no job for prison works. I always thought they would locked them up till their 18 years old and then moved them.

  13. I’ve never been so sad from watching a video on YouTube, I never even taken the time to comment anything. Wow just wow. I hope he can somehow come out of this fog this horrible place gave him. Literally have no words for what I just watched….

    As for that white guy, something needs to happen to him. Fuck that guy

  14. This is outrageous. Did he kill someone or hurt someone ? If the answer is no. Then wtf is supermax for a 15 year old ?

  15. Sad story he needs to go get treated by a new doctor the meds he is on is treated & limited to inmates they can’t have mind altering drugs this young man has severe anxiety depression a low dose of Xanax or something would help him. The drugs he listed are rarely effective looks up the stats

  16. Were I'm from 16 you going to prison a lot of my friends were up north in high school came home animals

  17. "A place 4 Bad Boys?!" U kidding? Your throwing children in cages with grown Men&Women! $$$ Money Money Money!! That's what it's all about. Bet that DA's kid doesnt end up in the box! Offences are Offences but theres a Huge difference in a repeat offender that understands the consequences, and a kiddo that fkd up..

  18. Good thing our white supremacist president has taken steps to prevent this from happening any longer. I can understand a horror sentence suspended and hanging over his head as a scare tactic due to the risk of reoffending once the reputation for his crime is sensationalized in his neighborhood but a super max for 13 years?!?
    What I just said is the reasoning behind it but 5 years in a juvenile facility would have knocked his dick in the dirt and straightened him out.
    Before people go there with the race card don't be an asshole it only makes things worse; there's no shortage of whites and Hispanics locked up under the same proposition.

  19. I was in a similar situation facing 30 years in prison for a first offense. I was in a after school fight two weeks later cops show up at my house with a warrant for robbery???? My life was turned upside down that day. As a child coming from a poor family you have no chance. I don't think but I know if it wasn't for the Christian boot camp I signed up for my life would be totally different right now. They need an opportunity just a chance to grow character and become responsible men, and prison is not the answer.

  20. Doctors are da real drug dealers psychiatrist are the real drug dealers an dey shouldn’t exist YO IT’S BLACK AN BROWN LUV FOREVA JUU HURRRRRRD✊🏿✊🏿✊🏿✊🏿✊🏿✊🏿

  21. So sad all the around for anyone who made a bad decision we don’t understand the consequences of getting locked up sometimes it’s a cake walk but others it really fucks up there mental and just being token away from family and living around other people that’s losing it and breaking down really fucks with you too

  22. They send the white kids that commit serious crimes go to the military…. Black kids go to adult super max prisons.

  23. TEACH your children NEVER too want what whites have..it's a booby trap for the poor…Master manipulators run TV & CHURCH … unplugging you from REALITY..belly of the beast .

  24. Another worthless piece of shit in this world..get a life. This douche bag is rapping..who cares about this trash

  25. I have a problem with the real thugs in suits and ties who get away with their evil and hypocrisy. These devils in power are never acquitted for their sins. Whereas these juveniles are a product of their environment and are set up by the government who makes the mouse maze for "poor" to have them under their control.

  26. that old white guy is an asshole. no empathy, compassion, common sense.
    reporter: "should he be given a 2nd chance?"
    old dude: "…….. BS answer….." real answer "no I don't think they should get a second chance…."

    old dude also said this is how the system is setup and there's no ways around it….
    how about we take a lesson from the rest of the world and try to rehabilitate young people especially someone like Alonza. He was between a rock and a hard place. He owned up to it and was repentant and then the system screwed him up.

    I hope he stays on the straight and narrow ascending to something great.

  27. maybe next time that he feels like sticking a gun and an innocent person's face he'll think about this before he does so. His story about being forced into doing it is laughable

  28. I feel like that medicine is even worse for him. I'm sure he would go through withdrawals if he didn't take em. I think he should definitely come off it still. I think it's making his mental state worse ☹️. Of course big pharma doesn't mind it though. Hope he stays out.

  29. "We either treat people who commit that kind of crime very seriously in order to protect people like his victims or we don't. There's no middleground."

    Sounds like something an idiot with a lot of power would say.

  30. Man, I ffel for this dude. Here's to hoping the trauma fades and you get a better second life. Same thing for any victim of any trauma, if it's a crime on them, a loss, anything that causes pain. Be well people.

  31. I cant believe they did this to this kid. He was 15 years old at time of his crime. No way in Hell he shoulda been locked up with adults. I'm talking from experience cause I used to be a staff member at a Juvenile Detenton center, and we had some 17 year olds there(16 when they were sentenced). There was also a maximum security facility in nearby Saginaw MI that housed kids from 12-17. This is crazy.

  32. and your nice happy little crap song or poem u wrote SUCKS LOSER. u r where u belong & hopefully someone will execute u before your time is up.

  33. I don't rob and steel. Getting rid of this problem is ok with me. Only I ask that both their biological parents be locked up as well. Regardless of wither or not they are in the picture. I also dont mind euthanizing our ratchet. I just don't care to hear any wawa stories. They have no effect on me at all.

  34. Should of gave him house arrest and Community service 2 years is more than enough time. Im sick that people that rape people get half that time

  35. This is crazy! And an typical.American thing….this so called Justice is no Justice and just creates more violence!!!!!This is a kid for god sakes…..give him a lesson but NO Adult Prison!!!!! I think what they are doing to young offenders IS A OWN CRIME BY ITSELF…!!!!

  36. Having worked in locked psych institutions, I can say that that poor kid is suffering some serious side effects from the meds they're prescribing him, particularly the 'psychotropics' that they give to schizophrenics…Also his facial expression, what psychiatrists call 'Blunted Affect', as well as his involuntary mouth movements and his speech… 🙁

  37. I just know he was sexually assaulted. Lord….i pray and hope the best for him. I think everyone with GOOD intentions shud fb him, and keep him motivated some how some way

  38. All experimentation..just like gangstalking..they wanna see when you'll crack..bunch a psychos run this world..

  39. Disheartening…hence, more people of color need to practice law- criminal defense. The majority of judges, prosecutors, etc are of a particular persuasion.

  40. I agree. This sentence was way too harsh given that he had no prior offenses and his age. Things need to change.

  41. OH CRY ME A RIVER!!! This guy got out young enough to build a life for himself. What if he had killed someone during the robbery? That would have destroyed a world. I wish this young man the best. I hope he has a productive, fulfilling life. But I don't feel sorry for him.

  42. The only good thing to come out of this is Alonzo Thomas was able to get the headphones of the teenage who committed suicide.

  43. I LOVE how he says when he saw them holding the gun sideways in MOVIES he thought it was a good idea to do the same !!! but remember….our movies etc don't cause any problems.

  44. I have a crazy idea how bout not committing crimes..?
    I have no pity for criminals instead I have more compassion for the victims…

  45. Thanks for posting. Alonza Thomas committed a serious crime for which he deserved to be punished; but the length and conditions of his imprisonment were not commensurate with his crime. There is no reason for the inhumane conditions. Returning young people like that into society does no one any good. It is in fact criminal, immoral. He is very lucky to have such a supportive family. Wishing him all the luck with his onward journey and hoping he can get to learn many new skills and gain back his confidence and zest for life.

  46. I was locked up with him at the same super max in 2001. I received 15 years as a 17 year old for bank robbery. I served 12 years on it, i have been out now over 6 years, doing great, have a beautiful wife, two gorgeous kids and a wonderful career. My years in prison were long, sad and dangerous. Somehow i survived it. I now take nothing for granted and appreciate my freedom way more then one can ever imagine. I am proof that it is never too late to change! Peace! 🙏🏽

  47. These kids can murder to and they will and should be locked up to the max as well if they act grown they get punished as is

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