UW-Madison May 12, 2017 Commencement Ceremony


(Processional Music)
>>Please remain standing for the singing of our national anthem, performed by Doctor
of Musical Arts, vocal performance, class of 2017 degree candidate, Jessica Kasinski. O, say, can you see, by the dawn’s early light, what so proudly we hail’d at the twilight’s last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight, o’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming and the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there O say, does that star spangled banner yet wave o’er the land of the free and the home of the brave (Applause)>>Provost Mangelsdorf:
Good evening. Welcome to the University of Wisconsin‑Madison’s
Spring Commencement Ceremony for doctoral, medical professional, MFA and honorary degree
candidates. Please join me in a round of applause to honor
and congratulate all of our graduates. (Applause) In the audience are spouses, children, parents,
siblings and many good friends. Thank you for all that you’ve done to support
tonight’s graduates and make it possible for them to be here. I’d like to ask our graduates to rise as they are able and applaud tonight’s audience for their support. (Applause) At this time, it’s my great pleasure to introduce
you to the members of our official party. I’m going to ask each one of them to stand
when their name is called and to remain standing. And I’ll ask the audience to please hold your
applause until all the members of the party have
been introduced. Rebecca Blank, Chancellor Regina Millner, President of the UW System
Board of Regents Cora Marrett, Honorary Degree Candidate Pamela Oliver, Professor of Sociology Marsha Mailick, Vice Chancellor for Research
and Graduate Education Ray Taffora, Vice Chancellor for Legal Affairs Laurent Heller, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration Charles Hoslet, Vice Chancellor for University Relations Steven Swanson, Dean of the School of Pharmacy Russ Coff, Senior Associate Dean of the School
of Business Margaret Raymond, Dean of the Law School Jeffrey Russell, Vice Provost for Lifelong Learning and Dean of Continuing Studies John Baldacchino, Executive Director of the Arts Institute Paul Zedler, Professor and Associate Director of the Nelson Institute for Environmental
Studies William Karpus, Dean of the Graduate School Leann Tigges, Professor, Community and
Environmental Sociology, and Chair of the Committee on
Honorary Degrees Tashia Morgridge, Honorary Degree Candidate Diana Hess, Dean of the School of Education Robert Golden, Dean of the School of Medicine
and Public Health Mark Markel, Dean of the School of Veterinary
Medicine Linda Scott, Dean of the School of Nursing John Karl Scholz, Dean of the College of Letters and Science Ian Robertson, Dean of the College of Engineering Kathryn VandenBosch, Dean of the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences Soyeon Shim, Dean of the School of Human Ecology Lori Berquam, Vice Provost for Student Life and Dean of Students Scott Owczarek, Registrar Richard Keller, Associate Dean of the International
Division Steve Smith, Secretary of the faculty. Amy Wendt, Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Chair of the University Committee, which is the Executive Committee of our Faculty Senate Please join me in welcoming these
distinguished individuals. (Applause) I would now like to introduce Rebecca Blank, Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin‑Madison. Chancellor Blank is an internationally‑respected
economist who has also spent time in Washington, DC, working in three different administrations. Most recently, she was Deputy Secretary and Acting Secretary of the U.S. Department of
Commerce under President Obama, prior to her selection to lead this great university in
2013. Chancellor Blank received her undergraduate
degree in economics from the University of Minnesota, and holds a doctoral degree in
economics from MIT. She has served on the faculty of Princeton,
Northwestern and the University of Michigan, where she served as Dean of the Gerald R.
Ford School of Public Policy. As Chancellor, she has committed herself to
maintaining the university’s position as one of the world’s top centers for discovery and
research ‑‑ educating students to compete in a global economy and helping University
of Wisconsin experts to share knowledge and innovation with the state, the
nation and the world ‑‑ what we call the Wisconsin Idea.
Please welcome Chancellor Rebecca Blank. (Applause)>>Chancellor Blank: Good evening, everyone,
and congratulations to all of tonight’s graduates. It is wonderful to have you all with us, and
I want to thank the many proud parents, spouses, partners, children, siblings and friends who
are also here tonight and who have supported these students and made this moment possible. 2017 is an important year, both for you and
for the University of Wisconsin. For you, 2017 marks the end of a long and
a sustained effort. Each of you has worked harder than you might
have imagined you could. You’ve made sacrifices, and now you’ve earned the credentials to work
at the highest level of your field. For the University, 2017 marks the 125th anniversary
of the Conferral of UW’s very first doctoral degree. That first graduate was Charles Van
Hise, who would later become the first alumnus to serve as
president of the UW. The next year, by the way, Kate Everest of
Fond du Lac became the first woman to earn a doctoral degree at UW.
And we were among the first universities in the nation to award a Ph.D. to a woman.
It’s worths applause, right? (Applause)
For both Mr. Van Hise and for Kate Everest. In your time here, no matter what school,
college, department, institute, or research center you have been part of, I hope you’ve
found an extraordinary community of scholars. I find this university a place of sheer intellectual
excitement and depth ‑‑ renews my energy and reinforces my passion about my work, and
I hope that you feel the same. This is a place whose commitment to interdisciplinary
collaboration has allowed some of you to work on fascinating and difficult problems with
colleagues from other fields. To develop new medical treatments… engineer new materials…
solve tricky legal questions… create works of art… and expand what we know about the
world. If we’ve done our job well, all of you are
leaving here with a deep, and a nuanced understanding of your field, ready to work on major challenges
facing both the nation and the world… including ‑‑ and I want to talk about this for a moment ‑‑
the challenge of communicating scientific information more effectively than in the past. The credential that you earn today is your
ticket to having a new conversation with the public, the media, and policymakers about
the critical issues that we face. It has never been more important to engage on energy, food,
safety, healthcare, and other key social and economic topics where scientific knowledge
is an important part of the public discourse. Your expertise is particularly important in
an era when we’re called upon to both defend what is true as well as debunk what is false.
Earlier this year, one of our Geoscience professors published a paper in the journal “Nature”
on a critical finding that changed what we know about how planets orbit the sun, and
which also affects how much solar radiation they get. Can you guess what happened next?
Well, it turns out that solar radiation affects climate, so a number of news outlets seized
upon that, blasting out headlines about a new explanation for climate change coming
out of the University of Wisconsin. That wasn’t what the research was about.
Twisting scientific findings to serve political purposes is absolutely nothing new. What is new is the speed by which this misinformation
gets passed along. None of us can change this on our own, but
we have an opportunity and a responsibility to take an
active role in communicating about the things we know best ‑‑ not just to our colleagues
but to the general public. A remarkable number of you, across many fields,
are already skilled communicators. Michael Dando is a former high school teacher
who came to us with a strong interest in finding better ways to connect with multicultural
students. He created a new approach that uses hip‑hop
as a foundation for teaching core subjects. His research study in a local school found
that this curriculum sharpened academic skills and engaged students from traditionally under‑served
populations. Today, Michael receives a Ph.D. from the School
of Education. Maichou Lor came to Madison as a child, from
a refugee camp in Thailand. She became her family’s health care advocate
at a very young age, and saw firsthand the barriers ‑‑ many of them related to communication
‑‑ that keep people from accessing basic medical care.
Her research in Nursing has already transformed what we know about how non‑English speakers
interact with the health care system, and is helping to develop new protocols to more
effectively serve that population. But Maichou is special for another reason.
We are told she is the first Hmong‑American in the United States to earn a Ph.D. in Nursing.
Congratulations, Maichou! Where are you out there?
(Applause) All of you have been immersed in a place whose
mission includes public outreach ‑‑ what, as the Provost noted, we call the Wisconsin
Idea. For many of you, communicating beyond the
borders of campus has been an important ‑‑ and maybe even a transformative ‑‑ part of
your education. But effective communication is not easy.
The classic academic approach of giving people a lot of facts and figures doesn’t always
work very well. Good communication requires listening, and
understanding the different ways in which people make sense of information.
And here’s a piece of advice you might be surprised by:
If you’re not using social media, you should be.
Social media outlets are now the No. 1 place people go to for information on scientific
topics, yet a survey of scientists from a range of academic disciplines last year revealed
that relatively few scientists use social media platforms. And those who do, use it mainly to communicate
with other scientists. That’s a little like taking a fancy Italian
racecar out for spin in your own cul‑de‑sac. It just misses the point.
You don’t have to become the public face of your profession or academic discipline.
But I hope you will be a voice to help your discipline communicate more effectively with
people outside the academic community. At a time when scientific work is often misunderstood
or even dismissed, all of us bear the responsibility to explain to a broader public why our work
is important and why it matters. In his famous essay, “The Purpose of Education”
‑‑ written 70 years ago ‑‑ Dr. Martin Luther King argued the aim of education should
be ‑‑ and I quote ‑‑ “to enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the
true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction.”
Those words seem truer today than they’ve ever been.
You’re now part of a tiny but very powerful community of the most highly educated people
in the world. I hope that you will use your education to
make this world a little better. And I hope you’ll take an active part in new
and more productive conversations that helps to discern the true from the false, the real
from the unreal, and the facts from the fiction. Thank you for being part of our UW community.
Best wishes to each of you as you set off on the next stage of your journey.
But wherever you go, be sure to come back and visit us every so often here in Madison
and let us know how you’re doing. Congratulations to every one of you, and On
Wisconsin! (Applause)
It is now my honor to introduce the President of the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents,
Regina Millner. Regina is a two‑time UW alum who earned
both a law degree and a master’s degree in real estate and urban land economics from
UW‑Madison. Her academic achievements are all the more
extraordinary because she came to us as a non‑traditional student, returning to school
as a single mom with three children. Since graduating, Regina has been very
involved with UW‑Madison. She’s served as President of the Wisconsin
Alumni Association and on our Athletic Board as a community member.
She brings a level of energy and passion to everything she does.
After her appointment to the Board of Regents in 2012, she toured every one of the UW System’s
13 four‑year colleges and listened to students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni.
Her energy, and her willingness to listen and learn, have marked her leadership of the
Regents. I am honored to present the President of the
Board of Regents ‑‑ and the most loyal Badger fan you will ever meet ‑‑ Regina
Millner. (Applause)
>>Regent Millner: Thank you, Chancellor Blank, for that kind
introduction. It’s a privilege to be here on this important
occasion. On behalf of my Regent colleagues, UW System’s
President Ray Cross, let me extend a special welcome to all of our students and guests
joining us for this celebration. Many people have helped these graduates along
their journey, providing support in ways both big and small, seen and unseen.
From your family and friends, to school teachers and UW faculty, there have been a number of
people dedicated to helping you. Your UW professors have worked hard to provide
you with the necessary knowledge and skill you’ll need to achieve success.
Together, all of these individuals have had a stake in helping you reach this big day.
I know they share the joy that you feel at this moment.
But today is really your day. We are celebrating your future.
This is an historic moment, and this is your day to remember in years to come. And adding
a little aside, it is my guess that in years to come, this day will be even more poignant
than it might be today. We know that there are many first‑generation
degree students and that your journey is one of pride for you and your entire family. You’ve taken the path of higher education,
and you have succeeded personally, as well as being a trailblazer for your family.
We also have families here that are continuing a tradition of higher education, and they
are also feeling that sense of profound joy. Together, all of our graduates and their families
celebrate your many wonderful accomplishments. We also know that many of you come from small
towns, while others from big cities, and some much further away.
What you have in common is you have met people from other parts of our state, our country,
from other cultures, other nations, and other perspectives.
And all have reached this finish line, which for each one is actually a starting point. Each of you will take your own, unique path
forward. But you share a commitment to using your knowledge
to improve other people’s lives in some way. One of our graduates today, Vanessa Reynolds
‑‑ Vanessa, would you put your hand up here?
Vanessa Reynolds is a great example of this. Vanessa had the opportunity to work with children
who have autism as an undergraduate when she attended UW‑La Crosse.
One day, she had a breakthrough with a little boy who had never before. spoken.
He looked at her ‑‑ out of the blue ‑‑ and said her name.
At that moment, Vanessa knew she would dedicate her career to some important work.
And some of the most important work is helping children reach their full potential.
Today, Vanessa earns a Ph.D. in school psychology. Congratulations to Vanessa.
(Applause) Now we know that each one of you have a similar
story in your journey. You have put in years of hard work and long
hours of study, and today, you’re earning a prestigious degree as you begin the next
stage in your life. The education and experiences you’ve gained
along the way will be tremendous assets to your future.
Perhaps more than even you might know, you are prepared for whatever that future may
hold. But today, you are earning more than another
degree. You are taking your place among the world’s
most capable and respected citizens. You are taking your place among those UW‑Madison
graduates that make a difference. We know that a vast majority of you will stay
right here in Wisconsin to live, work and raise your family. But whether you stay here, or stay in the
Midwest, or venture out around the globe, you are gaining a place in the wonderful and
dynamic community of the University of Wisconsin‑Madison alumni.
As you make this transition, I’d like you to keep in mind another role you take as a
graduate of UW‑Madison. There is no one better than you to tell the
story of this university’s value and its positive impact.
As a UW alum, you are carrying on our tradition of excellence.
You are becoming the next generation of graduates who see what is needed in the world around
us, and then work to find a solution. You will become the healers, the researchers,
the innovators and entrepreneurs of tomorrow. The UW System has always believed we should
benefit and learn from the past ‑‑ and think and train for the future.
This joint philosophy of education and service is a cornerstone of the Wisconsin Idea.
It helps to define who we are and what we do, both here on campus and in the great world
beyond. I believe that.
I’ve always believed that. And I believe that you have the potential, the passion, and the
power to change the world. I’m excited, as Chancellor Blank is, to see
what your future will hold. Graduates, cherish your connection to UW‑Madison,
to Wisconsin, and to your fellow alumni ‑‑ the friends you’ve made in your time here
and those you’ll meet in the future. These connections are real, they are powerful,
and they will stay with you forever. My fellow Regents, your loved ones, all your
professors, and all those who have helped you along your journey could not be more proud
of you here today. We celebrate your achievements and those you’ll
have in the future. Again, congratulations to you, and to your
families, and On Wisconsin! (Applause)
>>Chancellor Blank: Thank you, Regina Millner, for your remarks.
Today we are honored to have the privilege of awarding UW‑Madison honorary degrees.
An honorary degree is earned not by completing a course of study, but by living an extraordinary
life. Leann Tigges, professor of community and environmental sociology and chair of the Committee on Honorary Degrees, will read the degree citation for
each Honorary Degree candidate.>>Professor Tigges:
Chancellor Blank, on recommendation of the faculty of the University of Wisconsin‑Madison
and by vote of the Board of Regents, I present these individuals for honorary degrees. I call upon Professor Pamela Oliver to bring forward Cora Marrett. Cora Marrett, holds a bachelor’s degree from Virginia Union University and a master’s degree and a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin‑Madison, where she joined the faculty in 1974.
While a member of the sociology department, she was regarded as a stellar teacher and
mentor. She has worked to make science more inclusive
by using social science research to identify the best educational strategies for teaching
in ways that inspire new generations of scientists. From 1992 to 1996, she was an Assistant Director
at the National Science Foundation, then moved to the University of Massachusetts‑Amherst
as Provost, Senior Vice Chancellor for academic affairs and Professor of Sociology and Afro‑American
Studies. She returned to Wisconsin in 2001 to serve
as UW System’s Senior Vice President for academic affairs.
In 2007, she was hired once again as an Assistant Director at the National Science Foundation
and became Deputy Director in 2011. She also served twice as Acting Director.
She was recognized by the Wisconsin Alumni Association in 2012 with a Distinguished Alumni
Award. She stresses that inclusive science is better
science, as it draws on and nurtures the talent of people from all backgrounds.
Chancellor Blank, on the recommendation of the faculty, and by vote of the University
of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, I present Cora Marrett to receive the degree Honorary
Doctor of Science.>>Chancellor Blank:
Cora Marrett: In recognition of your teaching and leadership in inspiring our next generation
of scholars, the University of Wisconsin at Madison confers
on you the degree Honorary Doctor of Science Congratulations. (Applause)>>Cora Marrett: Thank you all very much.
When I learned of my nomination for an honorary degree, I was excited ‑‑ surprised, but
excited. I turned to that fount of all knowledge, Wikipedia,
of course. (Laughter)
And learned that the degree is one “for which a university has waived the usual requirements,
such as matriculation, residence, a dissertation and the passing of comprehensive examinations.”
How sobering to see the degree described by what it disregards rather than by what it
recognizes. But any discomfort I felt disappeared almost
immediately, as I reflected on the stellar attributes and contributions of those whom
this University has recognized. Indeed, I consider it a profound privilege
to share the stage today with Tashia Morgridge, who is known for the countless ways in which
she has advanced learning and the world of education.
Although Clyde Stubblefield is not present in person, his creativity, especially in music,
is enduring. The awardees from this University then stand
out for their stunning achievements. I found comfort as well in my knowledge of
the process through which the University selects honorary degree recipients.
Many years ago, I served as a member of the Committee on Honorary Degrees and was taken
by the Committee’s rigor in reviewing nominations. Those reviews rested unequivocally on demonstrated
and sustained dedication to excellence. More than one nomination fell in the absence
of convincing evidence that the nominee had pursued enduring activities with momentous
consequences beyond a narrow topic or community. Now during my service on the Committee, I
never anticipated that my name would someday be considered.
Whatever the circumstances that explained the outcome, I am moved today by what lies
ahead. In my view, the University of Wisconsin‑Madison
expects all of us who receive degrees ‑‑ whether earned traditionally, or not ‑‑
the expectation is that we will exhibit the values the institution exalts.
Perhaps nothing embodies the values better than does the Wisconsin Idea, that you’ve
heard, and will continue to hear, time and again. I can only hope that the recognition I am
given results in no small part from my dedication to that Idea.
But today let me reaffirm my determination to cultivate opportunities that reach across
generational, geographic, demographic, and other boundaries.
I end by saying to everyone, thank you. (Applause)>>Chancellor Blank: Thank you, Cora.
I call upon ‑‑ oh, sorry this is your line. (chuckles)>>Professor Tigges:
I call upon Dean Diana Hess to bring forward Tashia Morgridge. Tashia Morgridge, an alumna of our School of Education, has gone from student to teacher
to philanthropist, and consistently shared her passion for learning both as a special
education teacher and education advocate. Although her contributions have extended far
beyond Wisconsin, she has demonstrated a special commitment to her home state and alma mater.
Her understanding of and interest in education, both in school and in the broader sense, is
evident in her multiple degrees in education, her work and volunteerism, and her overall
commitment and life‑long dedication. The cornerstone values of her work are to
provide educational opportunities for all and to promote civic engagement through public
service in the context of the Wisconsin Idea. In 2007, Morgridge and her husband John, also
a UW‑Madison graduate, endowed and created the fund for Wisconsin scholars, which annually
awards nearly 3,000 grants to low‑income students attending one of Wisconsin’s public
colleges or universities. As an educator, advocate and volunteer, Tashia
Morgridge has made incredible contributions to improve the state of public education throughout
Wisconsin, across the country and around the world.
Chancellor Blank, on the recommendation of the faculty and by vote of the University
of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, I present Tashia Morgridge to receive the degree Honorary
Doctor of Humane Letters.>>Chancellor Blank:
Tashia Morgridge: In recognition of your dedication to students and the field of education, both
as a teacher and a philanthropist, the University of Wisconsin at Madison confers on you the
degree Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Congratulations. (Applause)>>Tashia Morgridge:
Thank you, Chancellor Blank. I am pleased, humbled and also amazed at the
same time. It’s extraordinary to be recognized by the
University from which I graduated many years ago. This means so much to me. And this is an honor that I will always remember.
And I also want to congratulate all of you. All those pages that you read, all those words
that you wrote, all those hours that you spent, all those nights that you did not sleep ‑‑
you did it ‑‑ and I congratulate you. I recently read a book that was called “100
Semesters,” and it’s by a gentleman called William Chace.
One of my takeaways was a statement by the author that the true purpose of a university
is the creation and preservation of knowledge. The creation and preservation of knowledge
are what all of you have been doing while at the University of Wisconsin.
You have had the honor to study because of your intelligence, your motivation, your curiosity,
and your creativity. Through your study, your research, your writing,
your artistic works and thinking you have had an opportunity to gain insight into the
works of other scholars who came before you. Some of you may have created new knowledge
that will be studied by future graduate students as part of their research.
Knowledge, however, is fleeting and knowledge must be continually refreshed and enhanced.
Learning is a delightful experience for young people and for old people.
It’s also your privilege, and perhaps your obligation, to preserve knowledge. As you leave your studies for the next event
in your lives, you will take your knowledge with you.
This knowledge is extremely valuable not just to you, but also to the world.
There are many ways to preserve knowledge. And you may choose to teach others, you may
go into research to keep expanding knowledge ‑‑ perhaps you will write books to share your
knowledge with all of us, or perhaps you will spread knowledge through your work or profession. This passing along and preserving of knowledge
is an important part of the next phase of your lives.
I hope you will find great joy in the years ahead.
The joy I’m talking about is the joy of working in a field you enjoy, with people you respect,
and where you have work that gives you personal satisfaction.
That’s what makes life worthwhile. When I left Madison with my degree in elementary
education, that degree served three important purposes.
It allowed me to become a teacher. It allowed me to help pay the tuition so that
my new husband John could go to study at the graduate School of Business.
And it later permitted me to return to school to study special education and then return
again to teaching. As an alum, I have been invigorated by the
engagement both John and I have been able to have here at the University.
Wisconsin has allowed us to be involved with young minds ‑‑ such as yours ‑‑
to be lifelong learners and to share our insights and wisdom with others.
It’s been so amazing to be in the company of all of you today.
Your brains are bursting with your new knowledge, skills, interests, theories, research idea,
artistic talent, manuscript outlines, clinical skills and teaching abilities.
You will be the artists whose work we will view in museums.
You will be the scientists who find the cures. You will be our doctors and lawyers.
You will write the novels, the poems, the news articles, the scientific papers and the
history books. You will teach the next generation of kindergarten
children or graduate students. You will be the leaders in our government,
in business, in civic organizations, and in nonprofits.
You will be the moms and dads who raise the next generation of citizens.
Whatever you do, do it well. Continue to learn, be an involved citizen,
and above all else, be an ethical person. Now it’s time to leave the university where
you have lived and studied, perhaps for many cold Wisconsin winters.
It is ‑‑ whoops ‑‑ I missed my page here. There it is, and I lost a page.
Oh, here it is. Oh, no. I found it. (chuckles). Okay. Here
we are. We’re back again. As a wise anonymous person once said, “footprints on the sands of time are not made by sitting down.” So get up, get out there, make some footprints, but be sure your footprints are leading where
you want to go. It’s also your responsibility to look back
at the footprints you have made, and see that many of those footprints in the sand started
here at the University of Wisconsin‑Madison. This is one of the places that nurtured your
intellect and your personal growth. In finding ways to give back to this outstanding
institution, you too will enjoy the opportunity for life‑long learning and the satisfaction
of giving back. Congratulations.
Thanks for listening. I hope you enjoy this next phase of your life.
Thank you. (Applause)>>Chancellor Blank: Thank you, Tashia.>>Professor Tigges:
And now, we posthumously honor Clyde Stubblefield, who accepted our offer of an honorary degree,
but sadly passed away on February 18. We remember the late Clyde Stubblefield, a
musician who kept the world’s toes tapping. Stubblefield was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee,
but called Madison home since the 1970s. Stubblefield used music to bring people together, playing
with James Brown at Boston Garden after the death of Martin Luther King Jr., and performing
for soldiers in Vietnam as part of Brown’s band.
His innovative style was recognized in 1990 when he was named Drummer of the Year by Rolling
Stone. In 2016, Rolling Stone once again honored
him, naming him the sixth‑best drummer of all time.
In 2000, he was inducted into the Wisconsin Area Music Industry Hall of Fame.
In 2004, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Madison Area Music Awards.
Madison Mayor Paul Soglin declared Oct. 10, 2015, Clyde Stubblefield Day.
Chancellor Blank, on the recommendation of the faculty and by vote of the University
of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, I recommend Clyde Stubblefield to be posthumously awarded
with the degree Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts. His music remains with us all.
>>Chancellor Blank: In recognition of Clyde Subblefield’s contributions
to the field of music and to the Madison arts community, the University of Wisconsin at
Madison confers on him the degree of Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts.
Although we are conferring the degree posthumously, before his passing, Clyde indicated he was
excited to get this degree and had never expected anything like this. With his passing last February, we thought
it only fitting to share just one of his prolific works in memoriam since he could not be here
to talk to you. So we’re going to show you an excerpt of “Funky
Drummer” as recorded by James Brown, with drum solo performed by Clyde Stubblefield.
This song’s drum break is among the world’s most sampled, used by Public Enemy, Beastie
Boys, Prince, George Michael, Sinead O’Connor, and many others.
Clyde frequently concluded communications with friends and family with the salutation ‑‑
Peace, love, happiness and good health! Let’s think of the happiness that his music
brought so many… (Applause)>>Chancellor Blank: It is now time for the conferral of degrees. I call upon William Karpus, Dean of the Graduate School.>>Dean Karpus:
Candidates for the degrees Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical Arts, and Master of Fine Arts will please rise. (Applause) Chancellor Blank.
>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Karpus.>>Dean Karpus:
These scholars have devoted significant time to graduate study and research. In addition, they have defended theses or presented exhibitions that have been accepted
by faculty committees as substantial contributions signifying scholarly or professional achievement in their respective fields. They are presented for the highest academic
recognition in their fields given by the university ‑‑ the degree Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor
of Musical Arts or Master of Fine Arts.>>Chancellor Blank:
On the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate School and under the authority granted by the UW system Board of Regents, I confer on you the degree Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical Arts, or Master of Fine Arts. In testimony thereof, you will receive your
diplomas. Candidates please be seated until the Marshals
instruct you to proceed to the platform. (Band playing processional music)
(Readers announcing names)>>Chancellor Blank:
I now call upon Robert Golden, Dean of the School of Medicine and Public Health.>>Dean Golden: Candidates for the degrees Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Physical Therapy, Master of Genetic Counselor Studies, Master of Physician Assistant Studies, and Master
of Public Health will please rise. (Applause) Chancellor Blank.>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Golden.>>Dean Golden: These scholars have successfully completed the requirements of the courses of study in medicine, physical therapy, physician assistant
studies, public health and medical genetics. Upon the recommendation of the faculty of
the School of Medicine and Public Health, I present these candidates for degrees.>>Chancellor Blank:
On the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Medicine and Public Health and under the authority granted by the University of Wisconsin System Board of Regents, I confer on you the degree Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Physical Therapy, Master of Genetic Counselor
Studies, Master of Physician Assistant Studies, or Master of Public Health. In testimony thereof, you will receive your diplomas. Candidates please be seated until the Marshals instruct you to proceed to the platform. (Band playing processional music) (Readers announcing names)>>Chancellor Blank:
I now call upon Mark Markel, Dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. (Applause)>>Dean Markel:
Candidates for the degrees Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and Master of Science‑Comparative
Biomedical Sciences will please rise. Chancellor Blank.>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Markel.>>Dean Markel: These scholars have successfully completed
the requirements of the courses of study in veterinary medicine and comparative biomedical
sciences. Upon the recommendation of the faculty of
the School of Veterinary Medicine, I present these candidates for degrees.>>Chancellor Blank: On the recommendation of the faculty of the
School of Veterinary Medicine and under the authority granted by the UW System Board of
Regents, I confer on you the degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine or Master of Science‑Comparative
Biomedical Sciences. In testimony thereof, you will receive your
diplomas. Candidates, please be seated until the marshals
instruct you to the platform. (Band playing processional music)
(Readers announcing names)>>Chancellor Blank: I now call upon Steven Swanson, Dean of the
School of Pharmacy. (Applause)>>Dean Swanson: Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy
will please rise. (Applause) Chancellor Blank.>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Swanson.>>Dean Swanson: These scholars have successfully completed
the requirements of the course of study in pharmacy. Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy, I present
these candidates for degrees.>>Chancellor Blank:
On the recommendation of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy and under the authority
granted by the University of Wisconsin System Board of
Regents, I confer on you the degree Doctor of Pharmacy. In testimony thereof, you will receive your diplomas. Candidates, please be seated until the Marshals instruct you to the platform. (Band playing processional music) (Readers announcing names)>>Chancellor Blank: I now call upon John Karl Scholz, Dean of
the College of Letters and Science.>>Dean Scholz:
Candidates for the degree Doctor of Audiology will please rise. (Applause) Chancellor Blank.>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Scholz.>>Dean Scholz:
These scholars have successfully completed the requirements of the course of study
in audiology. Upon recommendation of the faculty, the College
of Letters and Science, I present these candidates for degrees.>>Chancellor Blank: On the recommendations of the faculty of the College of Letters and Science and under the authority granted by the UW System Board of Regents, I confer on you the degree Doctor of Audiology. In testimony thereof, you will receive your
diplomas. Please proceed to the platform. (Band playing processional music)
(Readers announcing names)>>Chancellor Blank:
I now call upon Linda Scott, Dean of the School of Nursing.>>Dean Scott: Candidates for the degree of Doctor
of nursing practice, will please rise. (Applause) Chancellor Blank.>>Chancellor Blank: Dean Scott.>>Dean Scott: These scholars have successfully completed
the requirements of the course of study in nursing practice. Upon the recommendation
of the faculty of the School of Nursing, I present these candidates for degrees.>>Chancellor Blank: On the recommendation of the faculty of the
School of Nursing and under the authority granted by the UW System Board of Regents, I confer upon you the degree Doctor of Nursing Practice. In testimony thereof,
you will receive your diplomas. Please proceed to the platform. (Band playing processional music) (Readers announcing names) (Band playing “On Wisconsin”)>>Chancellor Blank:
Congratulations to all of our graduates. Thanks to the family members and friends whose support and encouragement made this proud day possible. Good luck. On Wisconsin. And one more round of applause for all of
our graduates. (Cheering and Applause) To conclude tonight’s celebration, please join Professor Leckrone and the University’s
School of Music band in singing ‘Varsity.’ (Band playing “Varsity”) Varsity! Varsity!
U‑rah‑rah! Wisconsin, Praise to thee we sing!
We sing! Praise to thee, our alma mater,
U‑rah‑rah! Wisconsin! (Cheering and Applause) (Band playing recessional music)

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