Socializing feral kittens!



this is a backyard colony that one of our neighbors feeds we spayed and neutered all the feral cats and provide her with food and she lets us know when any new cats might show up here's a new mom the broader kittens over to feed in our last socialization video we talked about how kittens that are over ten weeks of age can be extremely difficult to socialize the ideal window for socialization is between 4 & 6 weeks or even up to 8 weeks after that it's often recommended that you simply trap neuter and return the kittens if you don't have the ability to socialize them as these kittens are clearly over eight weeks old we have a tough decision to make do we have the time space and resources to try to socialize them so here's the planning checklist we have the cats on a feeding routine thanks to my neighbor we have access to traps we have upcoming ASPCA spay neuter appointments we have holding space and the ability to foster and try to socialize the kittens so we decided to go for it and remember we need to get the cats fixed anyway so we can go ahead and focus on trapping them and make a decision about socialization later this is called a drop trap it's a little trickier to operate than a regular trap so make sure that you have training before you use it we're going to feed the cats from under the trap for a few days before it's actually set notice mom is still looking around and one kitten isn't completely underneath the trap I need to make sure everyone is completely inside and focused on the food before I pull it I cover the trap of the sheet as soon as possible then it's time to load mom and kittens into different traps for transport next up everyone goes to the ASPCA and we'll see who's friendly after they're spayed neutered you can tell this little guy clearly misses his mom and siblings but I need to see if he's food motivated that will give me an early signal as to how easy he might be to socialize here we're just using regular plain chicken baby food [Laughter] you may think your bathroom is small but it's a perfect size space for these guys it's much much better than a shelter cage in fact cats actually prefer small spaces because it's easier for them to get comfortable quickly [Laughter] since the mom is feral she was spayed vaccinated and returned to her outdoor home after a 48 hour holding period a lot of people may think she would prefer to be with her kittens but that's just not true see the link in our description for more information one of our first goals for socialization is to get the kittens comfortable eating next to us you can do that by slowly pulling the food bowl closer and closer towards you and meal times are when you'll make the most progress because they're hungry and they're willing to cooperate [Laughter] [Laughter] [Laughter] we made a ton of progress in the first week just by spending one to two hours a day with them during meals so I knew with the right foster they could eventually be fully socialized and ready for loving homes once the crew was ready we placed them with a foster volunteer so they could get even more quality time

33 thoughts on “Socializing feral kittens!

  1. Regarding tipping the ears, I foster for San Antonio Pets Alive (SAPA), and am responsible for finding forever homes for my kittens. Unless requested, the clinic performing surgery for SAPA will not tip the ears. Doesn't ASPCA give you that option?

  2. I find myself intrigued by the nature of ferals, they're not mean, it's just that they haven't yet socialized themselves to us humans and it let to them fearing us.

  3. Your videos are so calm to watch.
    Your voice and the music…lovely I've done this work for a lot of years with cats..now not so much…but I have 5 cats and the street cats in the garden all spayed.well looked after and fed..you do great work.god bless.loxx

  4. Iโ€™m fostering my fifth litter today (3 total, brother/sister and an orphan). The orphan is pretty spicy, hissy and I havenโ€™t had much experience with hissy ones as feral as he is. These videos are helping and giving me hope!

  5. I have a cat since her 6 months. I adopted her when she was 2 months old. Earlier when I adopted her, she used to sleep on my chest and she was allowing anyone to touch. But then she was sick for 2 weeks and hense I decided, she wont be meeting any new people until she is fully recovered.
    After her recovery, she is not going to any other unknown human. She gets scared and find place for her to hide. She is very much comfortable with me and other 4 members in my family. She recognises her name. She asks for food or for play. And me and my family can hold her for 1 min max in a lap. She doesn't allow us to touch her belly but she allows her to touch her head and neck.
    She is quite friendly with us now.
    But the problem is, when some unknown human come to our house she get scared, can i fix this somehow, is there a way?
    Just because of this, going to vet and travelling is tidies. She is now 8 months old.
    Help if possible. Thanks

  6. Please keep up the amazing work! These videos help a ton with my severe anxiety and since I can no longer foster kittens due to my health decline even though i used to. I miss it dearly as kittens give me so much joy, but seeing you all help them with my own cats comforting me here I can kinda be there with ya! God bless, good job on helping all these poor babies ๐Ÿ’•๐Ÿ’•

  7. Oh thank you so much for posting this,vwill be very helpful, we have a mom and kitten that we need to get fixed and idvreally like to get them tamed, I'll feed them for as long as they stay but it would be nice to be able to handle and id like to bring one in to love.

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