Power Load Shedding In South Africa


Power load shedding is a reality in South
Africa today, and it is even more so now, in the year 2019. Load shedding creates inconveniences to people
in their daily living, undermines the economic growth of the country, and as such it is a
cause for concern to the government, and the people in this country. In this video, we are going to take a close
look at the meanings of national grid, load shedding, the stages of load shedding in South
Africa, steps taken by the government to contain the situation, and what you can do to assist
in your own small way, and collectively as responsible citizens. Also, you get the opportunity to download
a 14-page PDF document, published by Eskom, in responds to the most frequently asked questions
on the current load shedding in South Africa. The link to download the document is in the
description box below. What is the meaning of the National Grid? The National Grid of a country, is the electrical
network of high-voltage electrical power lines, between major electrical power generation
stations, interwoven with the transmission and distribution of the electrical power. By means of a national grid, various sources
of electrical generation can be unified into one, for the entire country. Also, the national grid allows for total control
of the electrical power network of a country. What is the meaning of load shedding? Load shedding is a measure, of last resort,
to prevent the collapse of the power system country-wide or the national grid. When there is insufficient power station capacity
to supply the demand from all the customers, the electricity system becomes unbalanced,
which can cause it to trip out country-wide, or a blackout, and which could take days to
restore. When power is insufficient, Eskom can thus
either increase supply, or reduce demand to bring the system back into balance. As the difference between supply and demand
becomes small, we refer to the system becoming tight. This implies that, action has to be taken
to prevent the system from becoming unstable. Eskom normally takes a sequence of steps to
keep the system stable and to avoid load shedding. The steps include first asking large customers
to reduce load voluntarily. However, if several power station units trip
suddenly and unexpectedly, we may have to skip those steps and go straight to load shedding
to prevent the system from becoming unstable. Scheduled load shedding is controlled by way
of sharing the available electricity among all its customers. By switching off parts of the network, in
a planned and controlled way, the system remains stable throughout the day, and the impact
is spread over a wider base of customers. Load shedding schedules are drawn up in advance,
to describe the plan for switching off parts of the network, in sequence during the days
that load shedding is necessary. On days when load shedding is required, the
networks are switched off, according to the predetermined plan, to ensure that, as far
as possible, customers experience load shedding, in accordance with the published load shedding
schedules. In exceptional circumstances, if scheduled
load shedding is not achieving, the required load reduction, and, or unexpected emergencies
or failures occur, then System Control Centres will shed load outside the published schedules,
by using emergency switching in order to protect the network. Such events are rare, but if a state of emergency
load shedding is declared, then all customers can expect to be affected at any time, and
the planned schedules may not necessarily apply. What Is Stage 1 Load Shedding? Eskom needs to shed 1000 mega-watts, to keep
the national grid stable. Stage 1 is the least disruptive of the schedules. Your area is likely to be hit by 2.5 hours
of blackouts once every second day, Monday to Saturday, between 05:30 and 21:00. Load shedding won’t take place overnight
or on Sundays. If you live in an Eskom-supplied area in Johannesburg,
you’ll be in for a 4-hour cut once every 4 days. What Is Stage 2 Load Shedding? Eskom needs to shed 2000 mega-watts, to keep
the national grid stable. Stage 2 involves double the amount of load
shedding planned in Stage 1. Your area is likely to be hit by 2.5 hours
of blackouts once a day, Monday to Saturday, between 05:30 and 21:00. Load shedding won’t take place overnight
or on Sundays. What Is Stage 3 Load Shedding? Eskom needs to shed up to 4000 mega-watts,
to keep the national grid stable. Stage 3 involves double the amount of load
shedding planned in Stage 2. Your area is likely to be hit by 2.5 hours
of blackouts up to three times a day. The load shedding will take place 24 hours
per day, and will also happen on Sundays. What Is Stage 4 Load Shedding? Eskom needs to shed more than 4000 mega-watts,
to keep the national grid from collapsing. Stage 4 is as bad as it gets in terms of load
shedding. Eskom starts additional, unscheduled power
cuts wherever it needs to, and outside of its schedules. This means your area can be hit by blackouts
at any time without any warning. The country hasn’t reached this stage since
2008. Stage 4 load shedding is the final option
for Eskom to prevent a national blackout. To contain the electrical energy crisis, currently
in South Africa, the government is bringing in external engineers to investigate the problems
at Eskom’s power stations, which have seen the country plunged into rolling blackouts
since Sunday 10 January 2019. Among other things, these experts will conduct
a full operations audit of all power stations, to ascertain where the most serious problems
lie. Public enterprises minister, Pravin Gordhan,
indicated to parliament, that the board of Eskom will appoint a panel of experts, to
compile an in-depth, and independent audit, to ensure that every technical problem is
fully understood. The board will also institute an urgent review,
to establish when the Medupi and Kusile power stations will realistically be completed,
as well as to determine the extent of design and other operational faults, what steps can
be implemented to minimise escalating costs, and what can be done to increase output. In a prepared speech, Gordhan revealed the
following. #1… Finance minister, Tito Mboweni, will announce
measures in the budget speech next week, to address some of Eskom’s financial requirements. #2… The government is calling on Enel, one of
the world’s leading energy suppliers, to provide it with external technical assistance. Enel will be soon sending 2 or 3 coal power
station engineers to South Africa. #3… Engineers who were trained by Eskom, but left
the entity during the period of corruption and state capture, to work elsewhere on the
continent, have indicated their desire to return home, and contribute to the rebuilding
of Eskom, in the spirit of Thuma Mina. As responsible citizens, the onus is on us
to get ourselves well informed and updated, on the current power crisis situation. We need to practise all the energy saving
tips, and avoid unnecessary use of electrical power. Also, we have to keep our families, friends
and community members in the loop. Let us all join hands and minds to save South
Africa. May God bless South Africa. Long Live Eskom! Long Live South Africa! Please do not forget to download the Eskom
document on the current load shedding. The link to download the document is in the
description box below. Thanks for watching. Please comment, like, share and subscribe.

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