I Remember | Program | #2112 — Paul G. Hayes


>>AT THE “MILWAUKEE JOURNAL” FROM 1962 TO 1995, HE COVERED A RANGE OF ISSUES, FROM REGIONAL PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION TO SCIENCE AND THE ENVIRONMENT. VETERAN NEWSPAPER REPORTER PAUL HAYES IS MY SPECIAL GUEST NEXT ON “I REMEMBER.”>>HI, I’M JIM PECK. WELCOME TO “I REMEMBER.” JOINING ME TONIGHT IS PAUL HAYES. HIS LONG CAREER AS A JOURNALIST INCLUDED MORE THAN THREE DECADES AT THE “MILWAUKEE JOURNAL.” LET’S TAKE A LOOK.>>NEWSPAPER REPORTER PAUL HAYES STARTED AT THE “MILWAUKEE JOURNAL” IN 1962. HE REPORTED ON TRANSPORTATION, WHEN THE PLANS FOR THE NEW FREEWAY SYSTEM WERE STILL EVOLVING. HE WAS A SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTER, AS SOME HOT TOPICS WERE BEING ADDRESSED BY THE NATION. HAYES WAS PART OF A TEAM AT THE NEWSPAPER AWARDED A 1967 PULITZER PRIZE FOR THEIR SERIES “POLLUTION, THE SPREADING OF MENACE.” IN 1979, HE COVERED THE WORST NUCLEAR ACCIDENT IN U.S. HISTORY. IT WAS THE PARTIAL MELTDOWN OF A NUCLEAR REACTOR IN PENNSYLVANIA AT THE THREE MILE ISLAND POWER PLANT. PAUL ALSO TRAVELED TO REPORT ON COAL MINING, STRIP MINING AND OTHER ENERGY ISSUES. HAYES FILED REPORTS FROM THE BRANDENBURG GATE IN GERMANY. WHEN THE BERLIN WALL CAME DOWN IN 1989, PAUL RETURNED TO SEE FIRSTHAND THE EFFECT ON EAST GERMANS ENTERING THE WEST AFTER SO MANY YEARS OF THE COLD WAR. AFTER A DISTINGUISHED CAREER, PAUL HAYES RETIRED FROM “THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL” IN 1995.>>DO YOU MISS THE FACT THAT YOU NEVER GOT TO OUTER SPACE?>>OH, YES.>>YEP?>>OH, SURE.>>TALK ABOUT THAT, YOU WERE IN THE RUNNING TO BE A JOURNALIST IN SPACE.>>THE SPACE AGENCY WANTED A JOURNALIST IN SPACE FOR PROMOTIONAL PURPOSES. OF COURSE. IN 1986, AND SO THEY SENT WORD OUT TO JOURNALISTS EVERYWHERE AND 1600 PEOPLE APPLIED.>>WOW.>>ALL YOU HAD TO DO WAS APPLY?>>WELL, YOU FILLED OUT FORMS, YOU SENT IN RESUMES, YOU ANSWERED QUESTIONS OF WHY YOU WANTED TO DO IT, WHAT YOU WOULD DO IF YOU DID IT. SO I DID. AND THE FIRST CUT WAS DOWN TO 100.>>WHOA.>>AND I THOUGHT THAT WAS WONDERFUL. THEY DID THAT JUST BY PUSHING PAPER ACROSS DESKS. AND THEN THEY INVITED 100 OF US TO GO TO FACE PANELS OF ACADEMICS, AND SPACE PEOPLE AND OURS WAS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, SO I DROVE OVER TO IOWA CITY, AND SPENT TWO NIGHTS THERE.>>THAT’S PRETTY EXCITING JUST IN ITSELF.>>IT WAS WONDERFUL AND I MADE THAT CUT. WE WERE DOWN TO 40.>>REALLY?>>SO –>>THAT DID THEY ASK YOU — WHAT DID THEY ASK YOU, WHAT SORT OF THINGS DID YOU HAVE TO TALK ABOUT?>>THEY SAID WHY DO YOU DO TO DO THIS? AND I SAID I THINK IT’S A GREAT OPPORTUNITY TO LOOK AT THE EARTH FROM SPACE, JUST AS THE MOON WALKERS DID. AND SEE THIS COLORFUL BALL AND I SAID, YOU HAVE TO — YOU HAVE TO REALIZE THAT WHEN THE SHUTTLE GETS UP THERE, IT DOESN’T MAINTAIN THE OUTER LOOK, IT TURNS OVER AND EVERYBODY ON THE SHUTTLE IS LOOKING DOWN AT EARTH.>>WOW.>>SO THIS IS A WAY TO SEE EARTH AND TO SEE THAT IT’S LIMITED, AND SEE THE BEAUTY OF IT AND THEY WERE IMPRESSED WITH THAT. AND –>>THAT’S MUCH BETTER THAN I WANT TO GET OUT AND PLAY GOLF.>>REALLY. AND I THINK THAT THEY THOUGHT THE TONE OF MY VOICE WAS OK, AND I HAD A SCIENCE REPORTING BACKGROUND ALREADY.>>YOU HAD AN EXTENSIVE BACKGROUND.>>YES. SO I MADE THE CUT FOR 40 AND THOUGHT, WELL, I HAVE A PRETTY GOOD CHANCE OF DOING THIS.>>WE’RE GETTING CLOSE.>>BUT I’M UP THERE WITH SOME REAL HEAVIES LIKE WALTER CRONKITE?>>OH REALLY. HIM.>>THAT MAN. AND THEN THE CHALLENGER TRAGEDY OCCURRED AND THE PROGRAM ENDED. AND THERE WAS A TWO-YEAR INTERVAL BEFORE THEY SENT UP ANOTHER SHUTTLE, AND THEY, OF COURSE, WENT BACK INTO IT VERY DEEPLY, AND TRIED TO FIX EVERYTHING, AND THE JOURNALIST IN SPACE PROGRAM WAS NEVER REVIVED.>>HOW LONG DID THE WHOLE PERIOD TAKE FROM AN APPLICATION TO GETTING DOWN TO THAT FINAL 40?>>ABOUT A YEAR.>>ABOUT A YEAR.>>WOW, THAT’S HEAD DILLARD UNIVERSITY STUFF.>>I WAS THRILLED AND I THOUGHT I HAD A VERY GOOD CHANCE TO GO, BUT –>>YOU COULD HAVE TRIPPED CRONKITE AT ONE POINT.>>BUT THE IRONY OF IT OF COURSE, YOU GOT VERY WELL KNOWN FOR SOMETHING YOU NEVER DID.>>YES. WELL THAT’S OK. BUT YOU COVERED SO MANY THINGS. YOU WERE SORT OF IN THERE AT THE BEGINNING OF THE EXPRESSWAY SYSTEM.>>I WAS.>>AROUND HERE. NOW, I SHOULD MENTION THAT THEY WERE CALLED EXPRESSWAYS, NOT FREEWAYS.>>EXPRESSWAYS.>>IS THERE A DIFFERENCE?>>THERE IS NOW. THERE WASN’T AT THE TIME. FREEWAY WAS A NEW WORD THAT CAME INTO BEING. AN EXPRESSWAY WAS A FOUR-LANE DIVIDED HIGHWAY, AND THAT WAS THE ORIGINAL NAME FOR THE SYSTEM THAT WAS PASSED UNDER THE — IN THE EISENHOWER ADMINISTRATION, THE INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM. AND THEN THE ENGINEERS DECIDED THAT THERE HAD TO BE A GRADATION IN NAMES, A FREEWAY WOULD BE A HIGHWAY COMPLETELY FREE OF GREAT ACCESS.>>I WONDER, AS WE’RE TALKING ABOUT THIS, HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE WATCHING IF YOU DON’T KNOW, IF YOU WENT ON 43 NORTH, YOU STOPPED AT SILVER SPRING, BENDER ROAD.>>THAT WAS AN EXPRESSWAY.>>THAT WAS AN EXPRESSWAY AND YOU CROSSED TRAFFIC. WELL, YOU GOT ABOUT 40 MILES AN HOUR AND THEN YOU HAVE TO HIT THE BRAKES.>>THAT’S RIGHT. IT WAS A MAJOR PROBLEM, AND TERRIBLE ACCIDENTS OCCURRED THERE. AND — BUT FREEWAY CAME ALONG AS THE WORD FOR A ROAD FREE OF ACCESS, BUT MOST PEOPLE DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THAT AND THOUGHT IT WAS SOMETHING OTHER THAN A TOLL ROAD. THEY THOUGHT IT WAS FREE OF SIDEWALK.>>I WAS SURPRISED WHEN I STARTED DOING RESEARCH FOR THIS, THAT THE CITY WAS IN CHARGE OF THAT.>>STARTED UNDER FRANK ZEIDLER.>>WHICH IS INTERESTING IN ITSELF. FRANK ZEIDLER IS SOMETHING WHO IS CARVING UP NEIGHBORHOODS WITH FREEWAYS.>>HE FELT THAT IT WAS NECESSARY AND THAT ALSO, HE WAS BUILDING PUBLIC HOUSING. THERE WAS — THE INNER CITY AT THE TIME WAS TERRIBLY NEGLECTED, AND HE FELT THE ONLY THING THAT COULD BE DONE THIS WAS TO TEAR DOWN SOME OF THE REALLY BAD STUFF, AND HE PROBABLY STEPPED A LITTLE TOO FAR IN THAT. WE TOOK DOWN TOO MANY HOUSES IN THE BUILDING OF THE NORTH-SOUTH FREEWAY, AND THEN IT WAS — IT WAS TRAGIC.>>IT CERTAINLY DISRUPTED NEIGHBORHOODS, BUT WHY THE CITY, I WOULD HAVE THOUGHT THAT WAS A COUNTY OR A STATE SITUATION.>>THE YEAR I GOT HERE, IT HAD MOVED FROM CITY TO COUNTY. SO IT BECAME THE COUNTY EXPRESSWAY.>>THAT WAS MEAN — THAT WAS 1962?>>THAT WAS 1962 AND THE LAST GUY OUT THE DOOR WAS COVERING HIGHWAYS, SO EVEN THOUGH I HAD NO BACKGROUND IN THIS WHATSOEVER , OF COURSE IT FELT A NEED TO BECOME THE HIGHWAY REPORTER.>>HOW DID THAT HAPPEN? DID SOMEBODY JUST SAY, HEY, YOU’RE GOING TO COVER THE HIGHWAY?>>WE NEED SOMEBODY ON HIGHWAY.>>REALLY. A REPORTER IS A REPORTER IS A REPORTER.>>WE JUST LOST THE GUY WHO WAS COVERING IT AND AT THE JOURNAL, WHICH WAS A LOCAL NEWSPAPER, THE OLD PRINCIPAL WAS A REPORTER IS AVAILABLE TO DO ANY STORY ISN’T ON ANY SUBJECT.>>WOW.>>SO YOU MIGHT DO A REALLY GREAT BANNER HEADLINE, ONE AFTERNOON AND SEE IT IN THE PAPER AND THAT NIGHT, GO OUT AND COVER THE WAUWATOSA COMMON COUNCIL, AND IN THE MORNING, COME IN AND DO THE WEATHER STORY OR YOU’RE ON OBITS.>>YOU HAVE A GREAT HEADLINE THAT YOU AND I WERE LOOKING AT BEFORE WE WENT ON THE SHOW, IT WAS A –>>A TORNADO.>>YEAH. THAT WAS — THAT WAS THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL COMPANY OWNED “MILWAUKEE SENTINEL.” THE HEARST OWNED SENTINEL HAD GONE OUT ON STRIKE, THE NEWSPAPER GUILD STRUCK THE SENTINEL, THE SUMMER I GOT HERE IN 1962, AND HEARST HAD SAID, IF YOU GO OUT ON STRIKE, I’M SELLING THE NEWSPAPER. THEY WENT OUT ON STRIKE, AND HE SOLD THE NEWSPAPER.>>I KNOW HEARST WAS VERY ANTI-UNION.>>YES, HE WAS. AND THE JOURNAL WAITED A POLITE LENGTH OF TIME, HOPING THAT SOMEBODY WOULD COME IN AND BUY THE PAPER AND KEEP THIS A TWO TWO-NEWSPAPER TOWN.>>THEY REALLY DID WANT SOMEBODY ELSE. THIS WAS TO THE A SUBTERFUGE.>>NO. AND THERE WAS A CONSORTIUM OF INDUSTRIAL LEADERS WHO FELT WE NEEDED ANOTHER NEWSPAPER, AND THEY TOYED WITH THE IDEA AND FINALLY DISCARDED IT AND THEN THE “CHICAGO TRIBUNE” CAME UP AND DID A MARKET STUDY AND APPARENTLY FELT THAT THEY COULDN’T MAKE IT WORK. SO AT THE LAST MINUTE, UNDER THE DIRECTION OF OUR PUBLISHER, IRV MAIER, THE JOURNAL COMPANY BOUGHT THE SENTINEL, ON A WEDNESDAY.>>THAT WAS WEIRD.>>IT WAS. IT WAS WEIRD.>>THEY WERE HIGHLY COMPETITIVE.>>HUGELY COMPETITIVE. THE JOURNAL COMPANY BOUGHT THE SENTINEL ON A WEDNESDAY AND SAID WE’RE GOING TO PUT OUT THE FIRST SENTINEL FOR MONDAY, I THINK IT WAS, AND SIX JOURNAL REPORTERS, INCLUDING ME AND FRANK AUKOFER AND A COUPLE OF OTHERS, WENT OVER TO THE SENTINEL AND BEGAN TO WORK ON THAT DAY AND WE WORKED THERE FOR SIX MONTHS.>>THEY DIDN’T THROW ANYTHING AT YOU?>>NO. NOT AT THAT TIME. AND IT WAS AN AMALGAM OF NEW JOURNAL PEOPLE AND OLD SENTINEL PEOPLE.>>YOU REALLY WANT TO EMPHASIZE THE FACT THEY COMPETED WITH EACH OTHER. THEY WEREN’T FRIENDS NECESSARILY.>>ABSOLUTELY NOT. THE SENTINEL AND JOURNAL WOULD STAFF THE SAME MEETINGS, WE WOULD HIDE OUR NOTES FROM EACH OTHER AND YOU GOT IN TROUBLE WITH THE SENTINEL BEATING YOU ON A STORY ON YOUR TIME. IT WAS — IT WAS THE EDITORS WERE HUGELY COMPETITIVE. AND THAT FLOWED DOWN INTO THE REPERTOIRIAL STAFF AND WE WERE EXTREMELY COMPETITIVE.>>I REMEMBER MY FRIEND BILL JANZ WAS A COLLEAGUE OF YOURS, HAD MADE A VOW THAT HE WOULD NEVER GO INTO THE JOURNAL NEWSROOM.>>NEVERUNTIL THE PAPERS MERGED IN 1995.>>THEN HE HAD TO.>>THEN HE HAD TO.>>TALK A LITTLE BIT, NOW YOU STARTED IN 1962 WITH THE JOURNAL. I HAVE A FEELING THAT IF I WALKED INTO THE 1962 JOURNAL NEWSROOM RIGHT NOW, IT WOULD LOOK VERY DIFFERENT FROM THE WAY IT LOOKED WHEN IT WAS 1962.>>DID THAT SENTENCE MAKE ANY SENSE AT ALL?>>YEAH, IT DID. WE HAD UPRIGHT TYPE WRITE, THEY WOULD PHONES HANGING ON THE DESK AND THEY WERE SHARED, WE DIDN’T HAVE OUR OWN PHONES, WEDDLE ELEVATOR OPERATORS, WE HAD TELEPHONE OPERATORS FOR LONG DISTANCE, WE HAD LOW-HANGING LIGHTS AND TILE FLOORS AND WE HAD SPITTONS.>>WOW.>>AND WE HAD THREE EDITORS WEARING GREEN EYE SHADOW. WE HAD CIGARETTE SMOKERS AND CIGAR SMOKERS. THE PLACE WAS GRAY. IT WAS AN OLD FASHIONED NEWSPAPER.>>IT WAS OUT OF THE FRONT PAGE.>>RIGHT OUT OF ROSALIND RUSSELL, THAT’S RIGHT.>>ROSALIND RUSSELL, ONE THING YOU PROBABLY DIDN’T HAVE MANY OF IS WOMEN?>>WE DID. WE DIDN’T HAVE MANY ON THE NEWS SIDE. THERE WAS A WOMEN’S SIDE, BUT THERE WERE A FEW WOMEN WHO HAD CROSSED THE BARRIER, COME INTO THE NEWS SIDE. ALICIA ARMSTRONG WAS ONE, SHE COVERED RELIGION AS A REPORTER FORM THE NEWS SECTION, SANDRA CODA WORKED ON THE STATE DESK, BARBARA SCHMALL WAS A REPORTER ON THE NEWS SIDE, SO THAT HAD BEGUN. BUT IT CERTAINLY PICKED UP STEAM IN THE 1970’S, AND NOW, OF COURSE –>>THE WOMEN THAT YOU MENTIONED AND DOROTHY WITTE AND JEAN OTTO, REALLY GOT KIND OF HAZED.>>I DON’T REMEMBER THAT. MAYBE THEY DID AND MAYBE THEY WOULD HAVE STORIES TO TELL, BUT I DON’T REMEMBER THAT THEY WERE TREATED WITH ANY DISRESPECT.>>OF COURSE, THERE WAS THE ICONIC, MRS. GRIGGS.>>OH, YES. SHE WAS THERE.>>WHAT WAS SHE LIKE?>>SHE HAD JOINED THE JOURNAL THE DAY OF MY — THE YEAR OF MY BIRTH.>>WOW.>>1934. WHAT WAS SHE LIKE? SHE WAS THIS SMALL PERSON WHO ALWAYS WORE EITHER A NAVY BLUE STRAW HAT IN THE SUMMER OR A NAVY BLUE FELT HAT IN THE WINTER, SHE HAD A NAVY BLUE SKIRT AND A WHITE BLOUSE, AND SHE WOULD COME INTO THE OFFICE AND UNLOCK HER DESK DRAWER AND TAKE OUT HER TELEPHONE, WHERE SHE LOCKED IT THE NIGHT BEFORE. AND OFTEN, IF YOU WERE WORKING AT NIGHT, MRS. GRIGGS WASN’T THERE, HER PHONE WOULD BE RINGING AND THERE WASN’T ANY WAY TO ANSWER IT. AND SHE WOULD DO HER COLUMN, IT JUST WAS A BREEZE, AND SHE WAS A LEGEND. AND THEN SHE WOULD LEAVE THE JOURNAL AND TAKE A TAXI TO HER ROOM AT THE WISCONSIN HOTEL WHERE SHE LIVED FOR DECADES.>>NEVER BOUGHT A HOUSE.>>NO.>>AND SHE WAS — I THINK EVERYBODY READ MRS. GRIGGS FIRST. YOU WOULD GET THE GREEN SHEET OUT AND READ MRS. GRIGGS AND SHE TOOK THAT VERY SERIOUSLY.>>AND SHE WAS SO POPULAR WITH THE — WITH THE READERS, THAT MANY OF THE WOMEN WHO READ HER NAMED THEIR DAUGHTERS IONE. I REMEMBER AT LEAST TWO OF THEM SHOWING UP AT A PARTY IN HER HONOR?>>REALLY?>>YEAH.>>IT WAS SUCH A DIFFERENT TIME. LET’S GO BACK TO FREEWAYS FOR A MINUTE, BECAUSE I CAN’T IMAGINE THE CITY WITHOUT FREEWAYS, BUT THERE WAS A TIME WHEN IT WAS HIGHLY CONTROVERSIAL.>>THEY WEREN’T CONTROVERSIAL TO START WITH. THE TRAFFIC, GETTING IN AND OUT-OF-TOWN, IN THE 1950’S AND 1960’S, JUST AFTER THE WAR WHEN ALL OF THE G.I.’S RETURNED AND THE TOWN BEGAN TO SPRAWL OUT BEYOND THE CITY BORDERS, TRAFFIC ON THE 6 — 6th STREET VIADUCT AND COMING ACROSS THE WISCONSIN VIADUCT, IT WAS INCREDIBLY BAD AND I REMEMBER A LITTLE OF THAT. I DROVE — WE HAD A FLAT ON THE NORTHWEST SIDE OF MILWAUKEE WHEN WE FIRST GOT HERE, AND DRIVING DOWN FOND DU LAC AVENUE TO GET INTO TOWN WAS — TOOK ABOUT AN HOUR.>>WAS A CHALLENGE?>>TOOK ABOUT AN HOUR AND 20 MINUTES ON A BAD DAY. SO SOMETHING NEEDED TO BE DONE. THE CURBLINER WERE STILL IN BUSINESS.>>WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?>>THE CURBLINERS WERE THE OVERHEAD POWERED BUSES ON RUBBER.>>YES.>>THOSE WERE TROLLEYS, WITH RUBBER WHEELS, SO THEY COULD PULL UP TO THE CURB AT A BUS STOP. BUT THEY WERE STILL IN BUSINESS. THEY WERE ABOUT — THEY WERE MONTHS AWAY FROM BEING TAKEN OUT OF SERVICE.>>IT WAS GREAT FUN WHEN THE THING WOULD COME OFF THE TRACK AND THE DRIVER WOULD HAVE TO GET OUT THERE, ALL TRACK STOPPED AND THEY WOULD HAVE TO PUT IT BACK UP AGAIN. YOU WERE PART OF A TEAM THAT WON A PULITZER PRIZE.>>1967. GEORGE LOCKWOOD WAS EDITOR OF WHAT WAS THE SUNDAY MAGAZINE AT THAT TIME, IT WAS CALLED THE PICTURE JOURNAL.>>OH, YES.>>AND WATER POLLUTION WAS JUST COMING INTO PUBLIC NOTICE, PARTLY BY SPORTS PEOPLE, THEY NOTICED THAT SOME OF THEIR — SOME OF THEIR BEST DREAMS WERE BEING FOLLOWED. SO PART OF THE EARLY ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT CAME OUT OF SPORTSWRITERS.>>REALLY?>>AND FISHERMEN AND HUNTERS. WHO SAW THE DETERIORATION UP CLOSE IN THE FIELD. ANYWAY, GEORGE SAID WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING ON WATER POLLUTION. AND THE MAJOR REPORTER ON THAT SERIES WAS DICK KIENITZ WHO WAS IN THE MADISON BUREAU AND COVERED THE OLD CONSERVATION COMMISSION WHICH WAS IN CHARGE OF WATER POLLUTION. HE SPENT MONTHS DIGGING INTO FILES, AND TOURING THE STATE. SAM CORNER — SAM KOSHOLLEK, WHO WAS A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER, FLEW OVER THE STATE AND TOOK PICTURES OF WATER POLLUTION FROM AERIALS.>>OH, IT’S CHILLING, SOME OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS SHOW THE “SCHMUTZ.”>>AND I DID A KIND OF A — I WAS A SECOND LEVEL REPORTER ON THE SERIES, NOT VERY IMPORTANT, BUT I DID A FEATURE ON THE COMPARING SIX RIVERS AND THEIR QUALITIES, INCLUDING THE MILWAUKEE AND THE ROOT AND THE PIKE, AND SOME OTHERS, AND THERE WERE PROBABLY A DOZEN OF US WORKING ON THAT — ON THAT PROJECT. IT RAN THREE WEEKS AND CONSUMED THE MAGAZINES.>>WOW.>>AND IT WON THE 1967 PULITZER PRIZE FOR PUBLIC SERVICE.>>HOW DO YOU FIND OUT THAT YOU’VE WON A PULITZER PRIZE?>>I FOUND OUT FROM THE EDITORS AND THEY FOUND OUT, I SUPPOSE, BY TELEPHONE.>>SOMEONE CALLED YOU IN AND SAID CONGRATULATIONS?>>WELL, THEY CAME OUT IN THE NEWSROOM AND SAID WE JUST WON A PULITZER, AND GEORGE, IT WAS DESERVING. IT WAS DESERVING FOR THE PEOPLE WHO REALLY PUT TIME IN ON IT. IT WAS A GREAT THING.>>IT’S A HUGE THING TO WIN. I MEAN, NOT MANY PEOPLE EVEN GET TO SNIFF ONE OF THOSE, MUCH LESS WIN ONE.>>BE PART OF IT.>>EXACTLY.>>YOU MENTION THE MILWAUKEE RIVER AND I REMEMBER GROWING UP SWIMMING IN THE MILWAUKEE RIVER.>>PROBABLY SHOULDN’T HAVE AT THE TIME.>>EVEN BACK THEN.>>YEAH. YEAH.>>MILWAUKEE RIVER WAS KIND OF A DISGRACE. WHEN I CAME TO TOWN. AND THAT’S ONE OF THE THINGS REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION DID. IT DID WATERSHED STUDIES. INSTEAD OF STOPPING IT AT THE POLITICAL BOUNDARY OF MILWAUKEE AND OZAUKEE COUNTY, SAID WE CAN’T DO ANYTHING ABOUT POLLUTION IN THE MILWAUKEE RIVER UNLESS WE LOOK AT THE ENTIRE RIVER, THAT’S WHY YOU HAD REGIONAL PLANNING, SO IT WENT BEYOND POLITICAL BOUNDARIES. SO THEY DID — THEY DID WATERSHED PLANNING, FINDING THE BOUNDARY OF THE MILWAUKEE BASIN, AND THEN TOOK MEASURES OF THE QUALITY OF THE RIVER AT THAT POINT AND HOW IT WAS USED. AND IT WAS THAT PLAN THAT LED TO, AT A TIME WHEN THERE WAS A LOT OF PUBLIC MONEY TO BE SPENT, BOTH AT THE STATE AND THE FEDERAL LEVEL, THAT LED TO THE CONSTRUCTION AND UPGRADING OF A WHOLE BUNCH OF UPSTREAM SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS. CLEANED THE RIVER UP, RESTORED THE FISHERY. IT’S STILL — IT’S STILL A DANGEROUSLY UNHEALTHY RIVER IN THE CITY OF MILWAUKEE.>>I WOULDN’T GO SWIMMING IN IT NOW.>>DON’T DO THAT, BUT IT’S MUCH, MUCH BETTER THAN IT WAS, AND I HAVE FISHING SPOTS ON THE MILWAUKEE NEAR MY HOUSE AND I WADE INTO IT PRETTY MUCH EVERY SPRING.>>DO YOU CATCH AND RELEASE OR EAT THE FISH?>>I CATCH AND RELEASE.>>YOU HAVEN’T GOT THE COURAGE TO EAT THEM YET?>>NO. SMALL MOUTHS AND NORTHERNS.>>I DIDN’T KNOW THAT. THERE WERE BIG SALMON RUNS THAT GO ON THE MILWAUKEE RIVER.>>I HAVEN’T FISHED THAT. THAT GOES ON SOUTH OF WHERE WE ARE. THIS IS A ROCK GARDEN IN NORTHERN OZAUKEE COUNTY, WHERE SMALL MOUTH HANG OUT. AND SO IT’S A GREAT –>>WHO WERE THE MAJOR WRITERS AT THE JOURNAL AND SENTINEL BACK THEN?>>IN THE OUTDOOR RUN, OR BEAT, MEL ELLIS, TOM GUYANT, JAY REED LATER.>>GUYANT I REMEMBER FROM HIS BOOKS. AND HE HAD JUST LEFT THE JOURNAL AND WAS CONCENTRATING ON HIS BOOKS.>>WONDERFUL BOOKS.>>”RUN RAINY RUN.” THEY WERE LOVELY AND HE WAS STILL DOING A COLUMN FROM TIME TO TIME FOR GEORGE’S MAGAZINE.>>I’M SORRY I INTERRUPTED YOU. YOU TALKED ABOUT SCIENCE.>>SCIENCE AT THE JOURNAL AT THAT TIME WAS KIND OF DIVIDED. WE HAD A MEDICAL REPORTER, JIM SPAULDING, AND WE HAD A SCIENCE REPORTER, HARRY PEASE, BUT HE CAME TO IT FROM SPACE, HE WAS COVERING THE BEGINNINGS.>>I REMEMBER HIS WRITINGS. OLIVER KUECHLE ALSO.>>OLIVER KUECHLE WAS THE SPORTS EDITOR.>>REALLY GOT DONE OVER BY THE MILWAUKEE BRAVES.>>OH, YES.>>– OWNERSHIP AT THAT TIME. I THINK THEY CONVINCED OLIVE OILILY THAT YOU HAVE TO HELP US — OLLY BECAUSE NOBODY IS COMING TO THE GAMES, WE’RE NOT GOING TO LEAVE, WE’RE NOT GOING TO LEAVE AND THEY LEFT HIM HOLDING THIS BIG EMPTY BAG.>>YEAH. THAT’S RIGHT. THAT WAS A BIG ONE.>>IT WAS. AND IT WAS A RICHARD S. DAVIS.>>RICHARD S. DAVIS. WHEN I CAME, HE HAD RETIRED BY THE TIME I GOT TO THE JOURNAL, BUT HIS REPUTATION AS PROBABLY THE BEST WRITER THAT THE JOURNAL HAD.>>HE WAS A BRILLIANT WRITER.>>HE WAS A WONDERFUL WRITER.>>I HAVE A BOOK OF ESSAYS HIDING AROUND IN ONE OF MY BOOKCASES.>>WHAT WAS THE STORY OF A LONG-STANDING BRIDGE GAME?>>BOB WELLS CHRONICLED THE BRIDGE GAME. BOB WELLS WHO WROTE THE HISTORY OF THE “MILWAUKEE JOURNAL” TRACED THE BRIDGE GAME BACK TO 1928. WHEN IT WAS AT A — AT THE M.D. DRUGSTORE ON WISCONSIN AND FOURTH, I THINK. PROBABLY IT WAS A SPEAKEASY. AND IT WAS IN A BACK ROOM AND THE ORIGINAL — KUECHLE WAS ONE OF THE ORIGINAL PLAYERS AND DAVIS WAS THERE. RUST LYNCH, WHO — RUSS LYNCH WHO WAS AN OUTDOOR REPORTER AND THEN LEFT THE JOURNAL AND BECAME SECRETARY OF NATURAL RESOURCES FOR THE STATE. AND LARRY LAWRENCE, WERE THE FIRST FOUR PLAYERS, AND I GUESS LYNCH BEGAN TO RIDE RICHARD S. DAVIS TO THE POINT HE COULDN’T STAND HIM ANY MORE AND HE THREW DOWN HIS HANDS AND NEVER PLAYED THE GAME ANYMORE. THAT MAY HAVE BEEN WHEN WELLS JOINED THE GAME.>>I LEARNED BRIDGE FROM MY OLDER BROTHER AND SAID I DON’T NEED TO PUT UP WITH THIS ABUSE. I THREW MY CARDS AND THAT WAS IT. I SWORE I WOULD NEVER PLAY AGAIN.>>SO THE GAME WENT ON EVERY NOON, SIX DAYS A WEEK, EXCEPT SUNDAY, FROM 1927, I BELIEVE, TO THE DAY THE JOURNAL CLOSED ITS DOORS AND REOPENED AS THE “MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL.”>>REALLY? ALWAYS AT THE DRUGSTORE.>>NO, IT WAS AT THE MD DRUGSTORE FOR A WHILE AND THEN IT WAS AT MIKE’S — MIKE’S, SOME KIND OF BAR, THAT’S WHERE THE ARENA NOW IS. IT WAS LONG BEFORE OUR TIME. THEN IT MOVED TO THE METROPOLITAN BLOCK. DO YOU REMEMBER THE BIG OFFICE BUILDING AT 3rd AND STATE ON THE NORTHEAST CORNER?>>YES.>>IT BURNED IN THE LATE 1970’S.>>I’M SURE IT WAS A COINCIDENCE.>>I DON’T THINK — IT COULD HAVE BEEN. IT COULD HAVE BEEN SOMEBODY THROWING A CIGARETTE IN THE WASTE BASKET.>>ENTIRELY POSSIBLE.>>AT THE BRIDGE GAME, BUT ANYWAY, THAT — AND THEN IT MOVED TO TURNER HALL AND THEN IT CAME TO THE JOURNAL CAFETERIA, WHICH WAS REALLY A LETDOWN.>>THAT’S REALLY TAME.>>FOR THOSE OF US WHO CARRIED OUR BAG LUNCHES INTO THE JOURNAL, THAT WAS OK.>>WHEN DID YOU START PLAYING BY THE WAY?>>ABOUT A MONTH AFTER I GOT TO THE JOURNAL.>>OH, OK. SO I PLAYED IN IT FOR 30 YEARS OR MORE.>>AS YOU LOOK BACK, PAUL, WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STORIES THAT STAND OUT IN YOUR MIND FROM A LONG CAREER?>>YEAH. IT WAS LONG. I HAD — I HAD — EVEN THOUGH MY SPECIALTY EVOLVED INTO ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, AND THEN INTO SCIENCE, I DID A LOT OF — WELL, I WAS ON THE SCENE AT THREE MILE ISLAND.>>OH, REALLY?>>YES.>>THE STORY BROKE I THINK ON A THURSDAY NIGHT AND I WAS THERE FRIDAY, AND I HAD — I WORKED 16 HOURS A DAY. THIS WAS THE SECOND TIME I HAD EVER BEEN IN WITH THE PACK JOURNAL — JOURNALISTS. THERE’S A PACK OF JOURNALISTS WHO JUST SHOW UP IN BIG STORIES, AND THEY CAN NUMBER ANYWHERE FROM 200 TO 1,000.>>WOW.>>AND I — THIS WAS MY SECOND EXPERIENCE WITH THE PACK. THERE WERE PROBABLY A THOUSAND JOURNALISTS. THE FIRST TIME I WAS EVER AMONG THE PACK, IT WAS LONG BEFORE I HAVE JOINED “THE MILWAUKEE JOURNAL,” I WAS WORKING FOR AN ARKANSAS NEWSPAPER IN MY SPARE TIME, I WAS WORKING AT FORT CHAFFEE ARKANSAS AS AN ARMY PUBLIC RELATIONS PERSON, I WAS IN THE ARMY, A DRAFTEE, AND TATTLE ADVICE PRESLEY WAS INDUCTED INTO THE ARMY, AND CAME THROUGH FORT CHAFFEE TO GET HIS FIRST HAIRCUT, AND TO GET HIS UNIFORM.>>WOULD.>>AND TO — WHOA.>>AND TO CHIN HIMSELF IN ORDER TO GO TO BREAKFAST AND OUR JOB AS PUBLIC RELATIONS PEOPLE ON THE BASE WAS TO TAKE CARE OF THE JOURNALISTS WHO SHOWED UP, ABOUT 300 PEOPLE.>>WOW.>>IT CAME FROM PARIS AND LONDON, NEW YORK, AND THEY WANTED ELVIS PRESLEY’S HAIRCUT AND WE SUPPLIED THEM WITH DESKS AND TYPE WRITERS AND TELEPHONES, BUT I HAD A CAMERA THAT I HAD JUST BOUGHT, A JAPANESE CAMERA AND I WAS AN AMATEUR WITH IT, BUT I WAS ABLE TO TAKE ABOUT THREE ROLLS FULL OF FILM OF ELVIS, AND BOTH IN COLOR AND BLACK AND WHITE, AND I HAD THESE CLOSEUP IMAGES OF THIS FAMOUS SINGER, IN FILM, AND I NEVER — I NEVER PRINTED THE FILM, ALTHOUGH IT WAS DEVELOPED, AND I COULD HAVE PRINTED IT. BUT I KEPT THEM IN A FILE, AND I CARRIED THEM WITH ME THROUGH THREE MORE NEWSPAPERS AND MY MARRIAGE AND LIVING IN CEDARBURG AND WORKING FOR THE JOURNAL IN THE LATE 1970’S, I WAS CLEANING OUT MY FILES AND I THOUGHT, WHAT IN THE WORLD AM I KEEPING THIS STUFF FOR, SO I DUMPED THEM.>>NO.>>THEY’RE IN THE LANDFILL OUT HERE IN MENOMONEE FALLS.>>OH.>>AND A YEAR LATER, ELVIS DIED AND ALL OF HIS FANS CAME OUT OF THE WOODWORK AND THIS STUFF, THIS WAS MY FIRST BRUSH WITH RICHES, AND I MISSED IT BY A YEAR.>>IT WAS YOUR ANNUITY.>>YES.>>AND YOU LIKED HIM.>>OH, YEAH. HE WAS — HE WAS A FRIENDLY, SMILING PERSON AND WE MADE CONSTANT EYE CONTACT, AND WE TALKED IN THE BARRACKS.>>PAUL HAYES. THANK YOU. GOOD TO HAVE YOU WITH US. IT WAS ALWAYS A PLEASURE, AND OF COURSE, IT’S ALWAYS GOOD TO HAVE YOU WITH US AND THAT’S ALWAYS A PLEASURE TOO. PLEASE JOIN US NEXT TIME AS WE CONTINUE TO REMEMBER. PAUL, THANK YOU.>>OK.

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